Bustard

Derived from the bird species of the same spelling, the surname is a nickname which has a similar translation to the name "Crane" i.e. a person with one leg or other striking physical features. The name is Heraldic, with a principle Coat of Arms granted to the Bustards of Devonshire and featuring Three Red Cannon Balls on a Silver Field surrounding a Red Sword Belt on which are displayed Three Gold Bustards. The Coat of Arms was granted c.1620. The name development includes Joseph Bustord of Dublin in 1760 and John Bustard of Castlefinn, Co. Donegal recorded on June 16th 1865. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Joane Bustard, which was dated 1610, married Vincent Whiddon at Bickleigh, Exeter, during the reign of King James I of England and VI of Scotland, 1603 - 1625. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • bustard — us tard (b[u^]s t[ e]rd), n. [OF. & Prov. F. bistarde, F. outarde, from L. avis tarda, lit., slow bird. Plin. 10, 22; proxim[ae] iis sunt, quas Hispania aves tardas appellat, Gr[ae]cia wti das. ] (Zo[ o]l.) A bird of the genus {Otis}. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Bustard — Bustard, Fluß im Britischen Nordamerika; entspringt in dem See Aschikunipi u. mündet in den St. Lorenzstrom …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • bustard — (n.) large crane like bird, late 14c., from O.Fr. bistarde, said to be from L. avis tarda, but the sense of this ( slow bird ) is the opposite of the bird s behavior …   Etymology dictionary

  • bustard — ► NOUN ▪ a large swift running bird of open country. ORIGIN perhaps a blend of Old French bistarde and oustarde, from Latin avis tarda slow bird …   English terms dictionary

  • bustard — [bus′tərd] n. [ME < OFr bistarde (< OIt bistarda) & ostarde, both < L avis tarda, lit., slow bird, prob. folk etym. for name of Iberian orig.] any of a family (Otididae) of large, heavy, long legged gruiform birds of Europe, Asia, and… …   English World dictionary

  • Bustard — Bustards Kori Bustard Scientific classification Kingdom: Animalia …   Wikipedia

  • bustard — /bus teuhrd/, n. any of several large, chiefly terrestrial and ground running birds of the family Otididae, of the Old World and Australia, related to the cranes. [1425 75; late ME, appar. b. MF bistarde (OIt bistarda) and MF oustarde, both < L… …   Universalium

  • bustard — [15] Bustard (the name of a large game bird now extinct in Britain) is something of a mystery word. Old French had two terms for the bird, bistarde and oustarde, both of which come from Latin avis tarda, literally ‘slow bird’ (Latin tardus gave… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • bustard — [15] Bustard (the name of a large game bird now extinct in Britain) is something of a mystery word. Old French had two terms for the bird, bistarde and oustarde, both of which come from Latin avis tarda, literally ‘slow bird’ (Latin tardus gave… …   Word origins

  • bustard — Stone Stone, n. [OE. ston, stan, AS. st[=a]n; akin to OS. & OFries. st[=e]n, D. steen, G. stein, Icel. steinn, Sw. sten, Dan. steen, Goth. stains, Russ. stiena a wall, Gr. ?, ?, a pebble. [root]167. Cf. {Steen}.] 1. Concreted earthy or mineral… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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