Brome

This name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is either a locational or a topographical surname. If the former, it derives from any one of the various places called Broom (in Bedfordshire, Durham and Worcestershire), Broome (in Norfolk, Shropshire and Warwickshire), and Brome, in Suffolk. Most of the places are recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086 as "Brume" or "Brom" and all share the same meaning and derivation from the Old English pre 7th Century word "brom", meaning (place of) broom or gorse. As a topographical surname Broome, Broom or Brome denotes residence near a place where broom grew. Roger Broome was an early emigrant to the New World, leaving London on the "Truelove" in September 1635 bound for New England. The christening of Thomas Broom was recorded at All Hallows, Honey Lane, London, on January 22nd 1618. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert de Brome, which was dated 1193, in the Pipe Rolls of Leicestershire, during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart, 1189 - 1199". Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • BROME — Du grec brômos , puanteur Symbole chimique: Br Numéro atomique: 35 Masse atomique: 79,904 g Point de fusion: 7,2 0C Densité (à 20 0C): 3,12. Liquide rouge sombre d’odeur piquante, irrite la peau, les yeux et les voies respiratoires; l’inhalation… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Brome — can refer to:*several species of grass, see Bromus. *Brome, Suffolk *Brome, Germany, a municipality in Lower Saxony, Germany. * Brome, a former provincial electoral district in Quebec,Canada now part of Brome Missisquoi *Brome, from Martin the… …   Wikipedia

  • brome — brome·grass; me·dio·brome; ozo·brome; brome; …   English syllables

  • Brome — Brome, n. [F.] (Chem.) See {Bromine}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • brome — [brōm] n. 〚< ModL < L bromos < Gr, oats, rustling < bremein, to rustle < IE base * bherem , to rustle, buzz〛 any of a large genus (Bromus) of grasses of the temperate zone, having closed sheaths and spikelets with awns: a few are crop plants but… …   Universalium

  • Brome — Brome, Marktflecken, so v.w. Brohme …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Brome — (spr. brōm), Richard, engl. Dramatiker des 17. Jahrh. (gest. wahrscheinlich 1652), stammte aus niedrigem Stande, wurde Diener bei Ben Jonson und lernte diesem die Art seiner Komik, namentlich die derb lebendige Charakteristik ab; doch hat er sich …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Brome — BROME, es, eine Nymphe, welche mit ihrer Schwester, der Bacche, den Bacchus in dessen Kindheit soll auferzogen haben. Serv. ad Virg. Ecl. VI. v. 15. Andere nennen sie Bromie, und machen sie zu einer von den Hyaden, die auch den Bacchus auf dem… …   Gründliches mythologisches Lexikon

  • brome — fibrome …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • brome — [brōm] n. [< ModL < L bromos < Gr, oats, rustling < bremein, to rustle < IE base * bherem , to rustle, buzz] any of a large genus (Bromus) of grasses of the temperate zone, having closed sheaths and spikelets with awns: a few are… …   English World dictionary

  • Brome — Wappen Deutschlandkarte …   Deutsch Wikipedia

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