Tench

Tench is of French origins, and is first recorded in Lincolnshire (see below). Traditional research suggested that it was a nickname for a rather "sleek" person, however logical analysis would infer that the name is metonymic for a keeper of fish, specifically Tench Fish farming was a popular medieval occupation, all the large houses and particularly monasteries had large fish ponds, and the tench with its ability to grow quickly, was a popular species. Whatever the origin the holders found it no bar to their progress, John Tench of London being granted arms by Charles 1 in 1626, whilst Sir Francis Tench of Leyton in Essex, was High Sheriff there in the year 1712. Watkin Tench (1759-1833) was a Lieutenant in the British Forces in the American War of Independence, being taken prisoner. Clearly his luck was out because no sooner had the Americans released him when he was captured by the French in 1794! However by 1811 he was a Major General and an Author. Clearly a man of considerable talent. Early recordings include William Tenche of Warwick in 1197, Wyllyam Tenche who married Joan Eaton at St. Dionis church, London on July 1st 1599 and James Tench, who married Mary Eyres by civil licence in London in 1618. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Alan Tenche, which was dated 1193, in the Pipe Rolls of Lincolnshire, during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • tench — /tench/, n., pl. tenches, (esp. collectively) tench. a freshwater food fish, Tinca tinca, of Europe and Asia that can survive short periods out of water. [1350 1400; ME tenche < MF, OF < LL tinca] * * * ▪ fish       (species Tinca tinca), widely… …   Universalium

  • tench — [tench] n. pl. tenches or tench [ME & OFr tenche < LL tinca] a small, European, freshwater cyprinoid fish (Tinca tinca) now established in North America …   English World dictionary

  • Tench — Tench, n. [OF. tenche, F. tanche, L. tinca.] (Zo[ o]l.) A European fresh water fish ({Tinca tinca}, or {Tinca vulgaris}) allied to the carp. It is noted for its tenacity of life. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • tench — [ tentʃ ] noun count a fish that lives in European rivers and lakes …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • tench — ► NOUN (pl. same) ▪ a freshwater fish of the carp family, popular with anglers. ORIGIN Old French tenche, from Latin tinca …   English terms dictionary

  • Tench — For the submarine class, see Tench class submarine. Taxobox name = Tench status = LR/lc | status system = IUCN2.3 regnum = Animalia phylum = Chordata classis = Actinopterygii ordo = Cypriniformes familia = Cyprinidae genus = Tinca genus authority …   Wikipedia

  • Tench — Benjamin Montmorency „Benmont“ Tench III (* 7. September 1953 in Gainesville, Florida) ist ein US amerikanischer Keyboarder und Songschreiber. Karriere Er ist neben Tom Petty und Mike Campbell Gründungsmitglied der Band Tom Petty the… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tench (EP) — Infobox Album | Name = Tench Type = Album Artist = Shriekback Released = 1982 Recorded = K.P.M. Studios by Ian Caple, Berry St. Studios by Brad Grisdale Genre = Pop rock Length = 25:12 Label = Y Records, Virgin Records Producer = David Allen,… …   Wikipedia

  • tench — [[t]te̱ntʃ[/t]] N VAR (tench is both the singular and the plural form.) Tench are dark green European fish that live in lakes and rivers …   English dictionary

  • tench — UK [tentʃ] / US noun [countable] Word forms tench : singular tench plural tenches a fish that lives in European rivers and lakes …   English dictionary

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