Margaret

Recorded in many forms including Margaret, Margett, Margott, this is an English medival surname. Introduced by returning Crusaders from the Holy Land in the 12th century and coinciding with the Christian Revival period, it dervies from the Greek word "margaretes" meaning pearl, although it is claimed that it is ultimately from Persian and to mean "child of light". Metronymic surnames, that is to say surnames from a female name rather than a male name, are much rarer. As to why they occur at all is interesting. They usually show that in medieval times and contrary to public opinion, women were often heiresses in their own right. Sons of these (married) women took their name rather than their fathers. Amongst the early recordings are Henry Margaret who was recorded in the Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire in 1273, and Hugh Margarete in the Hundred Rolls of Buckinghamshire in the same year, whilst John Margett appears in the Subsidy Rolls of Suffolk, dated 1524. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John Margaret. This was dated 1272, in the Hundred Rolls of Suffolk, during the reign of King Edward lst, and known as the "Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as the Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Margaret — may refer to: Contents 1 People 2 Places 3 Ships 4 …   Wikipedia

  • Margaret — bezeichnet ein weiblicher Vornamen, siehe Margaret (Vorname) ein Mond des Planeten Uranus, siehe Margaret (Mond) ein Manga Magazin für jugendliche Mädchen; siehe Margaret (Magazin) ein US amerikanischer Film aus dem Jahr 2008; siehe Margaret… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Margaret — f English and Scottish: an extremely common medieval given name, derived via Old French Marguerite and Latin Margarīta from Greek Margarītēs, from margaron pearl, a word ultimately of Hebrew origin. The name was always understood to mean ‘pearl’… …   First names dictionary

  • Margaret — マーガレット …   Википедия

  • Margaret I — may refer to: Margaret I, Countess of Flanders (died 1194) Margaret I of Scotland (1283 – 1290), usually known as the Maid of Norway Margaret I, Countess of Holland (1311 – 1356), Countess of Hainaut and Countess of Holland Margaret I, Countess… …   Wikipedia

  • Margaret II — may refer to: Margaret II, Countess of Flanders (1202 – 1280), countess of Flanders and Hainaut, aka Margaret of Constantinople Margaret II, Countess of Hainault (1311 – 1356), Countess of Hainaut and Countess of Holland Margaret II, Countess… …   Wikipedia

  • Margaret — hace referencia a: Margaret Bourke White, periodista estadounidense; Margaret Dumont, actriz estadounidense; Margaret Thatcher, política británica; Margaret, nombre que utilizaba la luchadora profesional Kia Stevens; Margaret, revista japonesa de …   Wikipedia Español

  • Margaret — Margaret, AL U.S. town in Alabama Population (2000): 1169 Housing Units (2000): 457 Land area (2000): 9.293058 sq. miles (24.068908 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.017480 sq. miles (0.045272 sq. km) Total area (2000): 9.310538 sq. miles (24.114180… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Margaret, AL — U.S. town in Alabama Population (2000): 1169 Housing Units (2000): 457 Land area (2000): 9.293058 sq. miles (24.068908 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.017480 sq. miles (0.045272 sq. km) Total area (2000): 9.310538 sq. miles (24.114180 sq. km) FIPS… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Margaret — fem. proper name (c.1300), from O.Fr. Margaret (Fr. Marguerite), from L.L. Margarita, female name, lit. pearl, from Gk. margarites (lithos) pearl, of unknown origin, probably adopted from some Oriental language [OED]; Cf. Skt. manjari cluster of… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Margaret — Margaret, Insel des Paumotuarchipels od. der Niedrigen Inseln (Östliches Polynesien) …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

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