Amiss


Amiss
This interesting and long-established surname is of medieval English origin, and derives from the Old French given name (or nickname) "Amis", the oblique case of "Ami", Friend, ultimately from the Latin "amicus", a derivative of "amare", to love. The name was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066, and the forms "Amicia" (feminine) and "Amisius" (masculine) are recorded respectively in Documents relating to the Danelaw, Lincolnshire, dated 1189, and in the Curia Regis Rolls of Hertfordshire, dated 1211. One Rogerus filius (son of) Ami was noted in the Chartulary of Ramsey Abbey, Norfolk, circa 1250, and a Robert Amys appears in the 1273 Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire. On January 18th 1573, William, son of Richard Ames, was christened in Dunstable, Bedfordshire. Notable bearers of the name were William Ames (1576 - 1633), the Arminian minister at Rotterdam in 1613, and professor of theology, Franeker (1622), and Joseph Ames (1689 - 1759), bibliographer and antiquary, who became a fellow of the Royal Society in 1743. On May 11th 1637, Joane Ames, of Yarmouth, a widow, aged 50 yrs., with her three children Ruth, William and John, were listed in a register of those "desirous to passe for New England and there to inhabitt and remaine". The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert Amis, which was dated 1221, in "Medieval Records of Suffolk", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • amiss — amiss, astray share the meaning wrong or otherwise than intended. Amiss implies failure (as of an arrow) to reach the mark aimed at and frequently suggests a shortcoming or defect (as by failure to reach a standard, an expectation, a definite… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • Amiss — A*miss , adv. [Pref. a + miss.] Astray; faultily; improperly; wrongly; ill. [1913 Webster] What error drives our eyes and ears amiss? Shak. [1913 Webster] Ye ask and receive not, because ye ask amiss. James iv. 3. [1913 Webster] {To take (an act …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • amiss — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ not quite right; inappropriate. ► ADVERB ▪ wrongly or inappropriately. ● not go amiss Cf. ↑not go amiss ● take amiss Cf. ↑take amiss …   English terms dictionary

  • Amiss — A*miss ([.a]*m[i^]s ), a. Wrong; faulty; out of order; improper; as, it may not be amiss to ask advice. Note: [Used only in the predicate.] Dryden. [1913 Webster] His wisdom and virtue can not always rectify that which is amiss in himself or his… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Amiss — A*miss , n. A fault, wrong, or mistake. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Each toy seems prologue to some great amiss. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • amiss — (adv.) mid 13c., amis off the mark, also out of order, lit. on the miss, from a in, on (see A (Cf. a ) (1)) + missen fail to hit (see MISS (Cf. miss) (v.)). To take (something) amiss originally (late 14c.) was to miss the meaning of (see …   Etymology dictionary

  • amiss — [adj] wrong; defective awry, bad, confused, crooked, erring, erroneous, fallacious, false, faulty, flawed, foul, glitched up*, haywire, imperfect, improper, inaccurate, inappropriate, incorrect, mistaken, out of order, sick, unfair, unlawful,… …   New thesaurus

  • amiss — index astray, defective, disordered, errant, erroneous, faulty, improper, inaccurate, inappropriate …   Law dictionary

  • amiss — [ə mis′] adv. [ME amis, on mis: see A 1 & MISS1] in a wrong way; astray, wrongly, faultily, improperly, etc. adj. wrong, faulty, improper, etc.: used only in the predicate …   English World dictionary

  • amiss — a|miss1 [əˈmıs] adj [not before noun] [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: miss mistake, failure ] if something is amiss, there is a problem = ↑wrong ▪ Elsa continued as if nothing was amiss. amiss with/in ▪ There s something amiss in their relationship.… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • amiss — [[t]əmɪ̱s[/t]] 1) ADJ GRADED: v link ADJ If you say that something is amiss, you mean there is something wrong. Their instincts warned them something was amiss... Something is radically amiss in our health care system. Syn: wrong 2) PHRASE: V… …   English dictionary


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