Alpe

This very unusual and intriguing name is of early medieval English origin, and a good example of that sizeable group of medieval surnames that were gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames. These were given in the first instance with reference to a variety of characteristics, including supposed resemblance to an animal's or bird's appearance or disposition. Alp, Alpe, Alps and Alpes, derive from the Middle English vocabulary word "alpe", bullfinch, given as a nickname to someone who bore some fancied resemblance to the bird, perhaps favouring bright colours or possessing a sweet singing voice. Other medieval surnames from bird names include Lark, Swan, Nightingale and Hawk. In some few instances of the surname Alp(s), the derivation may be from the Old French "alpe(s)", high mountain, pasture on a mountain-side, and thus a topographical name for someone living on or by such a place. Among the recordings of the name in London are the marriages of Hester Alpe and Thomas Stanton on January 11th 1579 at St. Lawrence Jewry, and of Edward Alp and Dorothy Wilson on February 19th 1698, at Finsbury. In France, Jean Nicolas Alp was christened on April 11th 1869 at Hestroff, Moselle. A Coat of Arms granted to an Alpe family of Norfolk depicts a fesse ermine between three silver alpes on a blue shield. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Matilda Alpe, which was dated 1275, in the "Hundred Rolls of Norfolk", during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • alpe — [ alp ] n. f. • 1405; de Alpes, lat. Alpes, nom d o. celt. ♦ Pâturage des Alpes. ⇒ alpage. Les troupeaux sont dans l alpe. ● alpe nom féminin Synonyme de alpage, dans les Alpes. ● alpe (synonymes) nom féminin Synonymes : alpage …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Alpe — ist im alemannischen Sprachraum die Bezeichnung für eine Alm (bairisch österreichisch) Alpe (Aller), ein Zufluss der Aller Alpe (Icking), Ortsteil der Gemeinde Icking, Landkreis Bad Tölz Wolfratshausen, Bayern Alpe (Philippsreut), Ortsteil der… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • alpe — scalp …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Ȃlpe — ž mn 〈G ā〉 geogr. planinski masiv (sustav) koji oblikuje klimatsku, hidrografsku i drugu granicu između srednje i južne Europe, proteže se od Francuske, preko Švicarske, Italije i Austrije do Slovenije i Hrvatske ∆ {{001f}}∼ Jadran dipl. oblik… …   Veliki rječnik hrvatskoga jezika

  • alpe — s.f. [lat. alpis ]. 1. (lett.) [rilievo montuoso: Come di neve in a. sanza vento (Dante)] ▶◀ catena (montuosa), gruppo (montuoso), montagna, monte. 2. (zoot.) [pascolo estivo d alta montagna] ▶◀ alpeggio, malga …   Enciclopedia Italiana

  • Alpe — Alpage Moutons dans les Pyrénées espagnoles …   Wikipédia en Français

  • alpe — àl·pe s.f. 1. CO parte più elevata di un monte | estens., monte, catena montuosa | LE per anton., con iniz. maiusc., le Alpi: il bel paese, | ch Appennin parte, e l mar circonda e l A. (Petrarca) 2. TS geogr. pl. con iniz. maiusc., sistema… …   Dizionario italiano

  • Alpe — Alp(e) Sf Bergweide erw. obd. (10. Jh.), mhd. albe, ahd. alba neben Alm (das aus einer Assimilierung des b/p an das n eines n Stammes kommt, bezeugt seit dem 14. Jh.) Nicht etymologisierbar. Geht offenbar zurück auf ein vorindogermanisches Wort,… …   Etymologisches Wörterbuch der deutschen sprache

  • Alpe — 1Alp, Alpe: Der Ausdruck für »Bergweide« (mhd. albe, ahd. alba) geht mit den Gebirgsnamen »Alb« und »Alpen« (Plural) wahrscheinlich auf ein voridg. *alb »Berg« zurück, das aber schon früh an die Sippe von lat. albus »weiß« volksetymologisch… …   Das Herkunftswörterbuch

  • Alpe — Ạl|pe 〈f. 19〉 = Alp1 * * * Ạl|pe, die; , n (westösterr.): ↑ 2Alp. * * * Ạl|pe, die; , n (österr.): 2↑Alp …   Universal-Lexikon

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