De Freyne

This interesting surname is a variant of Frain which is of early medieval English and Norman origin, and is a topographical name for someone who lived near an ash tree or ash wood. The name is derived from the Old French "fraisne, fresne", ash (tree), from the Latin "fraxinus", and was introduced into England by the Normans after the Conquest of 1066. Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names. The name development since 1156 (see below) includes: Thomas del Freisne (1206, Herefordshire), Peter de Frane (1228, London), Richard del Frene (1271, Staffordshire), Cristina Freen (1275, Worcestershire) and John del Freyn (1280, Somersetshire). The modern surname can be found as Frean, Frain, Frayn(e), Freen, Freyne, (De)Fraine and Defraine. Among the recordings in London are the marriages of Elizabeth Defraine and Thomas Jeroms on March 8th 1761 at St. James, Westminster, and of Thomas Defraine and Elizabeth Millner on December 19th 1766 at St. Clement Danes, Westminster. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William de Fraisn, which was dated 1156, in the "Pipe Rolls of Suffolk", during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The Builder of Churches", 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Freyne — may also refer to Baron de Freyne. Freyne is the anglicized version of the Irish surname of DeFrein. The name has a French background and is a common surname in Ireland …   Wikipedia

  • freyne — var. of frian, Obs …   Useful english dictionary

  • Freyne — This interesting surname is a variant of Frain which is of early medieval English and Norman origin, and is a topographical name for someone who lived near an ash tree or ash wood. The name is derived from the Old French fraisne, fresne , ash… …   Surnames reference

  • Baron de Freyne — Baron de Freyne, of Coolavin in the County of Sligo, is a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It was created 1851 for Arthur French, with remainder to his younger brothers John, Charles and Fitzstephen. He had earlier represented County… …   Wikipedia

  • Arthur French, 1st Baron de Freyne — and de Freyne (1786 ndash; 29 September 1856), was an Anglo Irish peer and Member of Parliament. De Freyne was the eldest son of Arthur French, of French Park. The French family had been major landowners in County Sligo and County Roscommon for… …   Wikipedia

  • Mickey Freyne — Personal information Sport Gaelic football Born County Roscommon, Ireland …   Wikipedia

  • Francis French, 6th Baron de Freyne — Francis Charles French, 6th Baron De Freyne (15 January 1884 24 December 1935). He was the son of Arthur French, 4th Baron De Freyne of Coolavin and Marie Georgiana Lamb. He married Lina Victoria Arnott, daughter of Major Sir John Alexander… …   Wikipedia

  • Arthur French, 5th Baron de Freyne — Arthur Reginald French, 5th Baron de Freyne (July 3, 1879 ndash; May 9, 1915) was born in London, to Arthur French of Frenchpark, County Roscommon (1855 1913), 4th Baron de Freyne, and his wife Lady Laura Octavia Dundas (died 1881).A graduate of… …   Wikipedia

  • Francis French, 7th Baron de Freyne — Francis Arthur John French, 7th Baron De Freyne (born 3 September 1927) is the son of Francis French, 6th Baron de Freyne and Lina Victoria Arnott. He married, firstly, Shirley Ann Pobjoy, daughter of Dougles Rudolph Pobjoy, on 30 January 1954.… …   Wikipedia

  • Arthur French — may refer to:* Arthur French (politician), MP for the Irish constituency of Roscommon (UK Parliament constituency) (1801–1821) * Arthur French, 1st Baron de Freyne (1786 ndash;1856), United Kingdom Member of Parliament for Roscommon (1821–1832) * …   Wikipedia

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