Cork

This interesting surname is a variant of Cork itself deriving from the Celtic word "corcair" (medieval English "Cork"), a purple or red dye stuff and was originally given as a metonymic occupational name to a supplier of this dye or to a dyer of cloth with cork. The ultimate origin of the name lies in the Latin "Purpura", the name of the shellfish from which the dye was obtained. The famous Tyrian purple was made from a mixture of these shells and was very costly to produce. Because the woollen robes worn by Roman Emperors was dyed with this colour, purple became symbolic of nobility and power. The occupation of dyer was therefore held in high esteem. The surname was first recorded in England in the late 13th Century, (see below). Adam le Corker, appearing in the 1296, "Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield", Yorkshire, held this position, (the final "er" on the name is the agent suffix). One William Corker, the infant son of Adam Corker was christened on May 30th 1596 at St. Mary, Magdalene, Bermondsey. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Geoffrey Cork, which was dated 1278, in the Calendar of Letter Books for London, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Cork — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Corcaigh Cork Escudo …   Wikipedia Español

  • Cork — irisch:Corcaigh Wappen Karte …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Cork — Cork …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Cork F.C. — Cork Full name Fordsons Football Club (19xx 1930) → Cork Football Club → Cork City Football Club (1938 1939) → Cork United Football Club (1939 1948) → Cork Athletic Football Club (1948 1957) Founded 1930 Dissolved 1938 …   Wikipedia

  • Cork — may refer to: Cork Oak, a deciduous tree Cork (material), used for bottle stoppers, insulation, floor and wall tiling, and noteboard, obtained from the Cork Oak Contents 1 Places 2 Parliamentary constituencies 3 Others …   Wikipedia

  • Cork — (k[^o]rk), n. [Cf. G., Dan., & Sw. kork, D. kurk; all fr. Sp. corcho, fr. L. cortex, corticis, bark, rind. Cf. {Cortex}.] 1. The outer layer of the bark of the cork tree ({Quercus Suber}), of which stoppers for bottles and casks are made. See… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • cork — [kôrk] n. [ME < Sp corcho, cork, ult. (via ? Ar al qurq) < L quercus, oak: see FIR1] 1. the light, thick, elastic outer bark of an oak tree, the cork oak ( Quercus suber) of the beech family, that grows in the Mediterranean area: used for… …   English World dictionary

  • Cork X SW — Cork X Southwest Music Arts Festival is an annual festival in Skibbereen, West Cork, Ireland. 2011 saw the festival in its fourth year. The festival took place on Liss Ard Estate in Skibbereen, West Cork on Saturday June 4th Sunday June… …   Wikipedia

  • cork — cork·age; cork; cork·er; cork·ite; cork·o·ni·an; re·cork; un·cork; cork·screw; …   English syllables

  • cork — ► NOUN 1) the buoyant, light brown substance obtained from the bark of the cork oak. 2) a bottle stopper made of cork. 3) a piece of cork used as a float for a fishing line or net. ► VERB 1) close or seal (a bottle) with a cork. 2) (corked) (of… …   English terms dictionary

  • Cork — Cork, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Corked} (k[^o]rkt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Corking}.] 1. To stop with a cork, as a bottle. [1913 Webster] 2. To furnish or fit with cork; to raise on cork. [1913 Webster] Tread on corked stilts a prisoner s pace. Bp. Hall.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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