Carous


Carous
This very early surname is found in a number of spellings including Carus, Carass, Caress, Cariss, Carass, Caris, Carriss, and possibly Cars and Carss. The early research indicated that the development was from the medieval word 'carre-hous' as shown in the recording of Thomas de Carrehous, of Sheffield, Yorkshire, in the 1379 Poll Tax Rolls for that county. 'Carr House' still survives as part of the town of Doncaster, and it is possible that this is the source of the surname. However it is equally possible that another 'Carrehous' may have formed part of Sheffield. There is also the village of 'Carrhouses' in Lincolnshire, which may have been a source. What is certain is that the name is of Norse-Viking origins, and describes a house on a Kjarr, a word for an area of dry land in a marsh. In the past researchers have suggested that the name translates as 'the house where carts were kept', but the locality of the name clearly defines a Nordic locational origin. Early recordings include James Carous in the Friary Rolls of Yorkshire in 1555, William Caras (1619) and Robert Carus (1709), being from the same source. The coat of arms also granted in Yorkshire has the blazon of a blue field, a black chevron charged with three red knights spurs, between nine white cinquefoils, spaced five and four. The crest is a black eagle displayed, beaked and spurred in gold, on the breast a cinquefoil. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Robert de Karhouses, which was dated 1332, in the Subsidy Rolls of Lancashire, during the reign of King Edward 111, known as 'The father of the English navy', 1327 - 1377. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pierre Carous — Parlementaire français Date de naissance 17 septembre 1913 Date de décès 14 janvier 1990 Mandat Député (1958 1962) Sénateur (1965 1990) Circonscription …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Valencienne — Valenciennes Pour les articles homonymes, voir Valenciennes (homonymie). Valenciennes L hôtel de ville et la place d Armes …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Colombières-sur-Orb — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Colombières (homonymie). 43° 34′ 52″ N 3° 00′ 38″ E …   Wikipédia en Français

  • carouser — ca·rouse (kə rouz’) intr.v. ca·roused, ca·rous·ing, ca·rous·es ▸ To drink large amounts of alcohol, especially in boisterous merrymaking. n. ▸ Carousal. ╂ [Earlier, a cup drunk up completely in one draft as a toast, from French, carous as in… …   Word Histories

  • carousse — ⇒CAR(R)OUSSE, (CAROUSSE, CARROUSSE)subst. fém. Vx et/ou fam. Réunion, partie de plaisir où l on boit copieusement. Ça allait êt carrousse pour un bout de temps (M. STÉPHANE, Ceux du trimard, 1928, p. 100). Expr. vieillie et littér. Faire… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • carrousse — ⇒CAR(R)OUSSE, (CAROUSSE, CARROUSSE)subst. fém. Vx et/ou fam. Réunion, partie de plaisir où l on boit copieusement. Ça allait êt carrousse pour un bout de temps (M. STÉPHANE, Ceux du trimard, 1928, p. 100). Expr. vieillie et littér. Faire… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • carouse — I. noun Etymology: Middle French carrousse, from carous, adverb, all out (in boire carous to empty the cup), from German gar aus Date: 1559 1. archaic a large draft of liquor ; toast 2. a drunken revel II. verb …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • Valenciennes — Pour les articles homonymes, voir Valenciennes (homonymie). 50° 21′ 29″ N 3° 31′ 24″ E …   Wikipédia en Français

  • carouse — ca|rouse [kəˈrauz] v [Date: 1500 1600; : French; Origin: carousser, from carous [i] completely (in boire carous to drink up ), from German garaus] literary to drink a lot, be noisy, and have fun >carousal n [U and C] …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Carouse — Ca*rouse (k[.a]*rouz ), n. [F. carrousse, earlier carous, fr. G. garaus finishing stroke, the entire emptying of the cup in drinking a health; gar entirely + aus out. See {Yare}, and {Out}.] 1. A large draught of liquor. [Obs.] A full carouse of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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