Byres


Byres
Recorded in a number of spelling forms including Byars, Byers, Byre, Byres, Bier, Biers, and Buyers, this is an English topographical or occupational surname, and possibly of pre 7th century Viking origins. It derives from the word "byre", meaning the cattle barn or dairy, and is one of a group of surnames which originate from working or living on a farm. These include Bull, Heffer, Stott, and Palfrey, all relate to the keeping of livestock, the prime agricultural function of the pre-Norman period before 1066. Perhaps not surprisingly given the importance of the occupation, this is one of the earliest of all recorded hereditary surnames, and it is also perhaps not surprising that it was in the cattle breeding regions of the Fens and the West Country, where originally the surname was most prevalent. There is also a possibility that in some cases the surname may have descended from an Olde English personal name "Bye", of unproven meaning. This is suggested by the recording of Thomas filius Bye of Cambridge, in the Hundred Rolls of the year 1279. Other early examples of the name recording include John Attebey also in the same Hundred Rolls of Cambridge, and William en le By of Somerset in 1327. The famous portrait painter of the 17th century Nicholas Byer, who died in 1681, was actually born in Norway, although possibly of English parents. The first known recording is believed to be that of Hugo de la Bye, a witness at the Assize Courts of Somerset, in the year 1243. This was during the reign of King Henry 111 of England, 1216 - 1272.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • byres — f ( e/ a) borer, graving tool, awl, chisel [borian] see byres …   Old to modern English dictionary

  • byres — baɪə n. cow shed (British usage) …   English contemporary dictionary

  • Byres Road — is a street located in Glasgow, Scotland and is the central artery of the city s West End. Effectively the Glaswegian equivalent of Chelsea s famous King s Road in London, Byres Rd is now a mixed commercial, shopping and upmarket residential area …   Wikipedia

  • BYRES, James — (1734–1817)    A Scottish antiquarian and architect who was one of the first to examine the tombs of Tarquinia, preserving much information now destroyed, and defend the reputation of the Etruscans against the depredations of the Romans. He also… …   Historical Dictionary of the Etruscans

  • James Byres — of Tonley, Aberdeenshire (1733 1817) was a Scottish antiquary and dealer in Old Master paintings and antiquities, a member of a family of Scottish Jacobite sympathizers [His father Patrick Byres went abroad after Battle of Culloden; The Byres… …   Wikipedia

  • David de Lindsay of the Byres — David de Lindsay the younger, also called David Lindsay of the Byres (died 1279), was a 13th century Scottish knight and crusader. A minor baronial lord of a family of English origin, he was the son of David de Lindsay and held lands in East… …   Wikipedia

  • Louise Burfitt-Dons — Louise Olivian Burfitt Dons (née Byres, born October 22, 1953) is an English writer, humanitarian and global warming campaigner who is best known for her anti bullying activism as the founder of the charity Act Against Bullying. Early years and… …   Wikipedia

  • Ashton Lane — is a cobbled backstreet in the fashionable West End of Glasgow. It is connected to Byres Road by a short linking lane beside Hillhead subway station and is noted for its bars, restaurants and a licenced cinema.The Lane was not always the focus of …   Wikipedia

  • Hillhead — is a residential and commercial area of Glasgow, Scotland. Situated north of Partick and to the south of North Kelvinside, Hillhead is located at the heart of Glasgow s fashionable West End, with Byres Road forming the central artery of the… …   Wikipedia

  • West End Festival — The West End Festival is an annual festival in the West End of Glasgow, Scotland.HistoryThe West End Festival in Glasgow was started in 1996 by Michael Dale as a small local festival centred on Byres Road.It has since become the biggest festival… …   Wikipedia


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