Bottle


Bottle
This interesting surname is of Old French origin, introduced into England after the Conquest of 1066. It was an occupational name for a wine steward, usually the chief servant of a medieval household, deriving from the Anglo-Norman French "butuiller", Old French "bouteillier", a butler. In the large households of royalty and the most powerful nobility, the title frequently denoted an officer of high rank and responsibility, only nominally concerned with the supply of wine. The surname may also be of medieval English origin, and was a metonymic occupational name for a maker of leather bottles, deriving from the Middle English "botel", bottle. Job-descriptive surnames originally denoted the actual occupation of the namebearer, and later became hereditary. Finally, the surname may also derive from the Old Norse personal name "Bothild(r)", of uncertain origin. Godwinus filius (son of) Botild, is noted in the "Kalendar" of Abbot Samson of Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk (1188), and Adam Botild is listed as a witness in the 1221 Assize Court Rolls of Gloucestershire. One of the earliest settlers in the New World was Paul Bottell, aged 32 yrs., who departed from the port of London aboard the "Mathew", bound for St. Christopher's in the Barbados in May 1635. A Coat of Arms granted to the family is a silver shield with a black fesse between three black escallops, the Crest being a blue escallop shell. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugo Buteiller, which was dated 1055, in the "Calendar of Documents preserved in France", during the reign of King Edward, known as "The Confessor", 1042 - 1066. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Bottle — Bot tle, n. [OE. bote, botelle, OF. botel, bouteille, F. bouteille, fr. LL. buticula, dim. of butis, buttis, butta, flask. Cf. {Butt} a cask.] 1. A hollow vessel, usually of glass or earthenware (but formerly of leather), with a narrow neck or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bottle — ► NOUN 1) a container with a narrow neck, used for storing liquids. 2) Brit. informal one s courage or confidence. ► VERB 1) place in bottles for storage. 2) (bottle up) repress or conceal (one s feelings). 3) ( …   English terms dictionary

  • bottle — bottle1 [bät′ l] n. [ME botel < MFr botele < OFr < ML butticula, dim. of LL buttis, a cask] 1. a container, esp. for liquids, made of glass, plastic, etc. and having a relatively narrow neck 2. the amount that a bottle holds 3. milk from …   English World dictionary

  • Bottle — Bot tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Bottled}p. pr. & vb. n. {Bottling}.] To put into bottles; to inclose in, or as in, a bottle or bottles; to keep or restrain as in a bottle; as, to bottle wine or porter; to bottle up one s wrath. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bottle up — (something) 1. to not express something. She bottled up her emotions throughout the tournament. The more you bottle that anger up, the more likely it is that it will explode. 2. to keep something from making progress. The French navy had bottled… …   New idioms dictionary

  • bottle it — british informal phrase to not do something because you do not feel brave enough He tried to jump, but he bottled it. Thesaurus: to not act, or to not do somethingsynonym to be, or to become afraid or frightenedsynonym Main entry …   Useful english dictionary

  • bottle — [n] container, usually for liquids canteen, carafe, cruet, dead soldier*, decanter, ewer, flagon, flask, glass, jar, jug, phial, soldier, urn, vacuum bottle, vial; concept 494 …   New thesaurus

  • Bottle — Bot tle, n. [OE. botel, OF. botel, dim. of F. botte; cf. OHG. bozo bunch. See {Boss} stud.] A bundle, esp. of hay. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] Chaucer. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bottle up — index repress Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • bottle up — [v] keep feeling inside oneself box up, check, collar, contain, coop up, corner, cramp, curb, keep back, restrain, restrict, shut in, suppress, trap; concept 35 Ant. confide, reveal, tell …   New thesaurus

  • Bottle — This article is about bottles in general. For baby bottles, see Baby bottle. Composite body, painted, and glazed bottle. Dated 16th century. From Iran. New York Metropolitan Museum of Art …   Wikipedia


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