Algore


Algore
This unusual surname derives from the Middle English personal name "Alger", which has an interesting, if complicated, derivation, since several names of different origins, both Continental Germanic (brought to England by the Normans), and Olde English, have fallen together in the course of its formation. These names include: "Aethelgar", Aelfgar and "Ealdgar", all sharing a common final element "gar", spear. The initial elements are respectively "aethel", noble, "aelf", elf, and "eald", old. The first two names occur in the Domesday Book of 1086 as "Aelgar, Elgar", and "Algar". The forms "Alger" and "Algar" (without surname) both appear in Records of Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, dated 1195. The derivation is further complicated by the fact that in regions of Scandinavian influence, the name may also stem from the Old Norse "Alfgeirr", Old Danish "Alger", cognate with the Anglo-Saxon "Aelfgar" (as above). Early examples of the surname include: Thomas Alger (Suffolk, 1221); Walter Elgar (Suffolk, 1234); and Thomas Algor (Cambridgeshire, 1260). In the modern idiom the name is spelt: Algar, Alger, Algore, Augar, Augur, Agar, Elgar and Elger. A Coat of Arms granted to the Algar family is a gold shield with a black eagle displayed, membered red, the Crest being a black greyhound's head, charged with four bezants. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Algar, which was dated 1221, witness in the "Assize Court Rolls of Worcestershire", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • algore — /al gore/ s.m. [dal lat. algor oris, der. di algēre avere freddo ], lett. [freddo intenso] ▶◀ gelo. ◀▶ ardore, bollore. ↓ caldo, calore. ‖ afa, canicola …   Enciclopedia Italiana

  • algore — al·gó·re s.m. 1. LE freddo intenso: in larghe falde | di condensati algori | incanutisce la nevosa bruma (Marino) 2. TS med. stato degli ammalati nel periodo algido di una febbre o di un infezione da cui sono affetti {{line}} {{/line}} DATA: av.… …   Dizionario italiano

  • algore — pl.m. algori …   Dizionario dei sinonimi e contrari

  • algore — s. m. (lett.) freddo intenso, gelo CONTR. calore …   Sinonimi e Contrari. Terza edizione

  • Al Gore — This article is about the former U.S. Vice President. For his father, who was also a U.S. Senator, see Albert Gore, Sr. Al Gore …   Wikipedia

  • Jargon of The Rush Limbaugh Show — Rush Limbaugh uses his own on air jargon on his radio show, The Rush Limbaugh Show , some of which he invented and some of which he merely popularized. Most are distorted versions of names. All terms are from Limbaugh s radio program unless… …   Wikipedia

  • Al Gore and the environment — Al Gore is the former Vice President of the United States (1993–2001), the 2000 Democratic Party presidential nominee, and the co recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He has been involved… …   Wikipedia

  • Barack Obama presidential primary campaign, 2008 — Infobox U.S. federal election campaign, 2008 committee = Obama for America campaign = U.S. presidential election, 2008 candidate = Barack Obama U.S. Senator 2005–present status = Announced February 10, 2007 Presumptive nominee June 3, 2008… …   Wikipedia

  • Vice Presidency of Al Gore — See also: Presidency of Bill Clinton Infobox Vice President name = Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. order = 45th Vice President of the United States term start = January 20, 1993 term end = January 20, 2001 president = Bill Clinton predecessor = Dan… …   Wikipedia

  • Democratic Party (United States) presidential candidates, 2008 — Democratic presidential primaries, 2008 2004 ← January 14 to June 8, 2004 → 2012 …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.