Weld


Weld
This English surname recorded in many spellings including: Wilde, Whilde, Wylde, Wylees, Weald, Weild, Weld, Welds, Wyeld, Wield, and others, has two possible origins. The first is or rather was, a medieval nickname for a high spirited, or over boisterous person. The derivation is from the Old English pre 7th Century 'wilde' meaning undisciplined or out of control. Secondly the name may be residential for a person who lived on at a village called Wild, Wylde or Wilde, or from an area of uncultivated land called a weald. This was descriptive for a large area of land used only for grazing, and forming part of the local common grazing rights. The surname was first recorded in the latter part of the 11th Century, making it one of the earliest on record. Examples taken from surviving rolls and registers of those ancient times include: William le Wilde, in the 1177 Pipe Rolls of the county of Leicestershire, and Henry le Wylde, who appears in the Court Rolls of the county of Essex in 1236. William de Wilde, who was recorded in the Pipe Rolls of Sussex, in the year 1200, came from a place called Wilde. This may have been the village now called Wild, in Berkshire, or from some now 'lost' medieval site. Other recordings showing some of the spelling forms include: John Wyeld, who was christened on March 5th 1610 at St. Olave church, in Old Jewry, city of London, whilst Sarah Wield married William Atkins on August 3rd 1763 at St. George's church, Botolph Lane, also in the city of London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is believed to be that of Ulricus Wilde. This was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of the county of Lincolnshire, during the reign of King William 1st of England, 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was sometimes known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop", often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Synonyms:
(Reseda luteola)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Weld — most commonly refers to a joint formed by welding. Weld may also refer toPeople* Weld family, an extended family of New England ** Theodore Dwight Weld ** Tuesday Weld * Weld Blundell family * Cecil Weld Forester, 1st Baron Forester * Cecil Weld… …   Wikipedia

  • Weld — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Frederick Weld (1823 1891), Premierminister von Neuseeland Theresa Weld (1893–1978), US amerikanische Eiskunstläuferin William Weld (* 1945), 68. Gouverneur von Massachusetts Weld (Familie), eine US… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Weld — Álbum en directo de Neil Young Crazy Horse Publicación 22 de octubre de 1991 Grabación Febrero abril de 1991 Género(s) Rock …   Wikipedia Español

  • weld — weld1 [weld] vt. [altered (with unhistoric d) < obs. well, to weld < ME wellen, to weld, WELL1, v.] 1. to unite (pieces of metal, plastic, etc.) by heating until molten and fused or until soft enough to hammer or press together 2. to bring… …   English World dictionary

  • Weld — Weld, n. The state of being welded; the joint made by welding. [1913 Webster] {Butt weld}. See under {Butt}. {Scarf weld}, a joint made by overlapping, and welding together, the scarfed ends of two pieces. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Weld — Weld, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Welded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Welding}.] [Probably originally the same word as well to spring up, to gush; perhaps from the Scand.; cf. Sw. v[ a]lla to weld, uppv[ a]lla to boil up, to spring up, Dan. v[ae]lde to gush, G.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • WELD — can refer to:* WELD (AM), a radio station broadcasting at 690 kHz on the AM band, licensed to Fisher, West Virginia * WELD FM, a radio station broadcasting at 101.7 MHz on the FM] band, licensed to Moorefield, West Virginia …   Wikipedia

  • Weld — (w[e^]ld), v. t. To wield. [Obs.] Chaucer. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Weld — (w[e^]ld), n. [OE. welde; akin to Scot. wald, Prov. G. waude, G. wau, Dan. & Sw. vau, D. wouw.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Bot.) An herb ({Reseda luteola}) related to mignonette, growing in Europe, and to some extent in America; dyer s broom; dyer s… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • weld — ► VERB 1) join together (metal parts) by heating the surfaces to the point of melting and pressing or hammering them together. 2) forge (an article) by such means. 3) cause to combine and form a whole. ► NOUN ▪ a welded joint. DERIVATIVES welder… …   English terms dictionary

  • Weld — Weld. См. Сварное соединение. (Источник: «Металлы и сплавы. Справочник.» Под редакцией Ю.П. Солнцева; НПО Профессионал , НПО Мир и семья ; Санкт Петербург, 2003 г.) …   Словарь металлургических терминов


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