Very


Very
This interesting old name is of early Medieval English and French origin. It was an occupational surname for a worker in iron. The name derives from the Old French term "ferreor", itself originally from the Roman (Latin) "ferrum". The word and hence the later surname was introduced into England at the time of the Norman Conquest, and during the next three centuries when French was the official language, it became well established as a surname. Later it was introduced again with the arrival of Hugunenot protestant refugees in the 16th and 17th centuries. Amongst the early recorded examples are James Farro of Yorkshire in 1525, and William Farrowe of the same county in 1528. The different spellings include Farrar, Farrer, Farrah, Farra, Farrey, Farrow, Faro, Pharaoh, Pharo, Pharro, Pharrow, and the dialectals Vary, Varah, Varrow, Vairow, Varey, Very, Verry, and Virie, some of which are also recorded in France. Amongst the recordings in the early surviving registers of the diocese of Greater London are those of Beatrice Varie, christened at St Mary Somerset, on October 25th 1584, Jean Veerrie, a witness at the French Church, Threadneedle Street, on May 19th 1633, and Francis Varey who married Grace Dickinson, at St James church, Dukes Place, on September 10th 1694. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugo Farrour. This was dated 1379, in the Poll Tax rolls of Yorkshire, during the reign of King Richard 11nd of England, 1377 - 1399. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Synonyms:

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  • very — very, much 1. The uses of very and much as intensifying adverbs are for the most part complementary. Very qualifies adjectives and adverbs (very large / very slowly), whereas much qualifies past participles that are used as adjectives (a much… …   Modern English usage

  • Very — Ver y, a. [Compar. {Verier}; superl. {Veriest}.] [OE. verai, verray, OF. verai, vrai, F. vrai, (assumed) LL. veracus, for L. verax true, veracious, fr. verus true; akin to OHG. & OS. w[=a]r, G. wahr, D. waar; perhaps originally, that is or exists …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Very — Véry Véry Pays  France …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Very — may refer to: * Very, an English adverb, expression of comparative degree. *Very (album) by the Pet Shop Boys *Very (lunar crater) *Very (crater on Mars)People with the surname Very: *Jones Very, poet *Frank Washington Very, astronomer …   Wikipedia

  • Very — Студийный альбом Pet Shop Boys …   Википедия

  • very — [ver′ē] adj. [ME verai, true < OFr < VL * veraius < L verus, true < IE * weros, true < base * wer , to be friendly, true > Ger wahr, true, OE wær, a compact] 1. in the fullest sense; complete; absolute [the very opposite of the… …   English World dictionary

  • Very — Ver y, adv. In a high degree; to no small extent; exceedingly; excessively; extremely; as, a very great mountain; a very bright sum; a very cold day; the river flows very rapidly; he was very much hurt. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Very — puede hacer referencia a: Very, cráter del planeta Marte. Very, cráter de La Luna. Frank Very, astrónomo norteamericano (1852 1927). Very (álbum), un álbum de 1993 de Pet Shop Boys. Esta página de desambiguación cataloga artículos relacionados… …   Wikipedia Español

  • very — [adj] real, exact actual, appropriate, authentic, bare, bona fide, correct, especial, express, genuine, ideal, identical, indubitable, mere, model, perfect, plain, precise, pure, right, same, selfsame, sheer, simple, special, sure enough, true,… …   New thesaurus

  • Véry — País …   Wikipedia Español

  • very — ► ADVERB 1) in a high degree. 2) (with superlative or own) without qualification: the very best quality. ► ADJECTIVE 1) actual; precise. 2) emphasizing an extreme point in time or space. 3) with no addition; mere …   English terms dictionary


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