Tison


Tison
This interesting and unusual surname has two possible origins; firstly, it may be a nickname for someone of a fiery temperament, deriving from the Old French "tison" meaning firebrand. Secondly, it may be a dialectal variant of the name Dyson, a metronymic of the pet name "Dye", from the medieval female given name "Dennis", itself coming from the Latin personal name "Dionysius" meaning follower of Dionysis, an eastern god introduced to the classical pantheon at a relatively late date, and bearing a name of probably Semitic origin. The surname dates back to the late 11th Century (see below), whilst early recordings include Adam Tisun (1130) in the Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire, and Gilbert Tuison of Nottingham in 1332. Later Church Records list the christening of Richard, son of Roger and Ellen Tison, on December 21st 1564 at St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, Elizabeth Tussaine at St Mary Whitechapel on February 2nd 1669 and John Tuson, with his wife Hannah, witnesses at St Mary Whitechapel, London, on April 9th 1674. A Coat of Arms granted to nameholders has the blazon of a green field charged with a gold lion rampant crowned. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Gilbert Tison, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book of Nottinghamshire, during the reign of King William 1, known as "The Conqueror", 1066 - 1087. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • tison — tison …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • tison — [ tizɔ̃ ] n. m. • v. 1180 tisun; lat. titio → attiser ♦ Reste d un morceau de bois, d une bûche dont une partie a brûlé. « Quelques tisons rougeoyaient encore dans la cheminée » (F. Mauriac). Souffler sur les tisons. Tisons et braises. PROV. Noël …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • tison — TISON. s. m. Reste d une buche, d un morceau de bois, dont une partie a esté bruslée. Tison allumé, tison ardent. tison esteint. rapprocher les tisons. On dit d Un homme qui est ordinairement auprés du feu, qu Il garde les tisons, qu il est… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Tison — Le mot tison désigne en ancien français un morceau de bois, allant du tison jusqu à la quille d un navire. Difficile donc de savoir ce que le surnom désigne ici (origine : latin titionem). C est en tout cas dans le département du Nord qu il est… …   Noms de famille

  • tison — Tison, Il vient de Titio. Un tison allumé, Torris huius torris. Un tison de feu esteinct, Titio titionis …   Thresor de la langue françoyse

  • tison — (ti zon) s. m. 1°   Reste d une bûche, d un morceau de bois dont une partie a été consumée. •   Je trouve des tisons du feu de la Saint Jean, RÉGNIER Sat. XI. •   J agace mes tisons ; mon adroit artifice Reconstruit de mon feu le savant édifice,… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • TISON — s. m. Reste d une bûche, d un morceau de bois, dont une partie a été brûlée. Tison allumé. Tison ardent. Tison éteint. Rapprocher les tisons. Fam., Garder les tisons, être toujours sur les tisons, avoir toujours le nez sur les tisons, se dit D… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • TISON — n. m. Reste d’une bûche, d’un morceau de bois, dont une partie a été brûlée. Tison ardent. Tison éteint. Rapprocher les tisons. Fig., Tison d’enfer se dit, par exagération, d’un Méchant homme, d’une méchante femme, qui excite au mal par ses… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 8eme edition (1935)

  • tison — nm. ; tison à moitié consumé ; branche de bois allumée à l extrémité ; (GEX.) âtre, foyer, (de la cheminée) : tizon (Albanais.AMA., Chambéry, Villards Thônes), tuizon (Arvillard), tuzin, twizin (Cordon). A1) tison à moitié consumé ; branche de… …   Dictionnaire Français-Savoyard

  • Tison Street — Tison C. Street (b. Boston, Massachusetts, May 20, 1943) is an American composer of contemporary classical music and violinist.He studied violin with Einar Hansen (the concertmaster of the Boston Symphony Orchestra) from 1951 to 1959. He later… …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.