Sprigging


Sprigging
This very uncommon name is of early medieval English origin, and is one of the patronymic forms of the surname Sprig(g)in(g) or Spriggen, itself a diminutive form of Sprigg. The name is a good example of that interesting group of early European surnames that were gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames; these were given in the first instance with reference to a variety of personal characteristics, frequently involving a person's physical appearance, attributes or peculiarities. In the case of Sprigg, the nickname was for a tall, thin, bony person, from the Middle English "sprigge", twig, branch, thought to be ultimately of Old Norse or Low German origin. There is also some evidence that the word was used as a personal name; one "Spriginus" is recorded in Norfolk in the 12th Century. Early examples of the surname include: William Sprig (1199, Norfolk); Roger Spriggens (circa 1300, ibid.); and Simon Sprugin (1273, Cambridgeshire). Recordings of the name from Church Registers are found chiefly in Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Hertfordshire, and include those of the christening of Richard, son of Richard Sprigings, on April 29th 1599, in Monks Risborough, Buckinghamshire, and the marriage of Richard Sprigings and Ann Peirce at St. Stephen's, St. Albans, Hertfordshire, on May 18th 1786. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William Sprigin, which was dated 1273, in the "Hundred Rolls of Norfolk", during the reign of King Edward 1, known as "The Hammer of the Scots", 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sprigging — For the method of pottery decoration, see Sprigging (decorative). Sprigging is a method of plant propagation whereby cuttings of stolons or rhizomes are planted instead of seed onto the soil surface or into furrows or small holes. This method is… …   Wikipedia

  • Sprigging — Sprig Sprig, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sprigged} (spr[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sprigging} ( g[i^]ng).] To mark or adorn with the representation of small branches; to work with sprigs; as, to sprig muslin. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sprigging — sprɪg n. shoot, twig, small branch; ornament resembling a shoot or sprig; youth, young man, lad; headless nail v. mark or decorate with small branches …   English contemporary dictionary

  • sprigging — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Sprigging (decorative) — Sprigging or sprigged decoration is an embossed decoration on pottery, usually press moulded shapes applied to greenware or bisque.Clay body for the sprig is pushed into the mould, the back scraped flat, then released on a damp cloth pad. The… …   Wikipedia

  • Hydroseeding — (or hydraulic mulch seeding, hydro mulching, hydraseeding) is a planting process which utilizes a slurry of seed and mulch. The slurry is transported in a tank, either truck or trailer mounted and sprayed over prepared ground in a uniform layer;… …   Wikipedia

  • sprig — 1. n. & v. n. 1 a small branch or shoot. 2 an ornament resembling this, esp. on fabric. 3 usu. derog. a youth or young man (a sprig of the nobility). v.tr. (sprigged, sprigging) 1 ornament with sprigs (a dress of sprigged muslin). 2 (usu. as… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Sprig — Sprig, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sprigged} (spr[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sprigging} ( g[i^]ng).] To mark or adorn with the representation of small branches; to work with sprigs; as, to sprig muslin. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sprigged — Sprig Sprig, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Sprigged} (spr[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sprigging} ( g[i^]ng).] To mark or adorn with the representation of small branches; to work with sprigs; as, to sprig muslin. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sprig — I. noun Etymology: Middle English sprigge Date: 14th century 1. a. a small shoot ; twig < a sprig of parsley > b. a small division of grass used for propagation 2. a. heir …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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