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Sandever

Translation
Sandever
This is a topographical and locational name of ancient origins. It derives from the Olde English "Sand-Forda", meaning one who dwelt at or was responsible for "the Sandy Ford", or from residence at one of the several villages called Sandford or Sandyford found from Westmoreland to Devon. The precise meaning is probably "The smooth or even shallow Ford" whilst the name development includes, Bartholomew de Sandford (1280, Worcestershire), John Sandford (1473, Nottingham). Elizabeth, daughter of Brian Sandford, was christened at St. Mary Magdalene, London on October 12th 1543, and Elyn Sanford married Robert Gregory in Uxbridge, London on October 29th 1543, whilst on October 1st 1679, John Sandford was granted a ticket on the Ship "Barbados Merchant" bound for Virginia Colony, America. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Jorden de Sandforda, which was dated 1175, in the Pipe Rolls of Warwickshire, during the reign of King Henry 11, known as the Church Builder, 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sandever — San de*ver, n. See {Sandiver}. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sandever — Sandiver San di*ver, n. [Perh. fr. OF. sa[ i]n grease, fat + de of + verre glass (cf. {Saim}), or fr. F. sel de verre sandiver.] A whitish substance which is cast up, as a scum, from the materials of glass in fusion, and, floating on the top, is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sandever — noun also san·di·ver ˈsandəvə(r) ( s) Etymology: Middle English saundiver, probably from Middle French saïn de voirre grease of glass : glass gall * * * sandever, devoire see sandiver …   Useful english dictionary

  • sandiver — variant of sandever * * * /san deuh veuhr/, n. a whitish, saline scum formed on the surface of molten glass. Also called glass gall. [1300 50; ME saundyver < MF suin de verre grease of glass. See SWEAT, VITRI ] * * * sandiver /sanˈdi vər/ noun …   Useful english dictionary

  • glass gall — Sandiver San di*ver, n. [Perh. fr. OF. sa[ i]n grease, fat + de of + verre glass (cf. {Saim}), or fr. F. sel de verre sandiver.] A whitish substance which is cast up, as a scum, from the materials of glass in fusion, and, floating on the top, is… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sandiver — San di*ver, n. [Perh. fr. OF. sa[ i]n grease, fat + de of + verre glass (cf. {Saim}), or fr. F. sel de verre sandiver.] A whitish substance which is cast up, as a scum, from the materials of glass in fusion, and, floating on the top, is skimmed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English