Roll

Recorded as Role, Roll, Rule, Rolls, Rolles, Rolse, Rowles, and others as shown below, this is a medieval English surname which with the suffix 's' is a patronymic meaning 'son of'. However its origins are both 11th century Norman-French and pre 6th century Germanic from the male given name Roul or Rolf. The ultimate origin lies in the ancient name 'Hrolf', a fused compound of the elements "hrod" meaning renown, and "wulf," a wolf. This name seems to have reached England by two separate channels. It was very popular amongst the invading Normans of 1066, but may have been introduced as well by the earlier Scandanavians known to history as "The Vikings". The surname was first introduced like most others, in the 13th century, (see below), and examples of further recordings include Robert Role in the Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire in 1279, and Matilda Rolles in the Hundred Rolls of Huntingdonshire for the same year. Other forms of the surname include Row, Rowes, Rowe, and Rolfes, whilst later recordings from the church registers of the city of London include John Rowles who married Agnet Fetherstone on November 13th 1541, at St. Stephen Walbrook, and Mary Roll who was christened at St. Andrew's Holborn on April 4th 1575. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • roll — roll …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • roll — [rōl] vi. [ME rollen < OFr roller < VL * rotulare < L rotula: see ROLL the n.] 1. a) to move by turning on an axis or over and over b) to rotate about its axis lengthwise, as a spacecraft in flight 2. a) to move or be mov …   English World dictionary

  • roll — ► VERB 1) move by turning over and over on an axis. 2) move forward on wheels or with a smooth, undulating motion. 3) (of a moving ship, aircraft, or vehicle) sway on an axis parallel to the direction of motion. 4) (of a machine or device) begin… …   English terms dictionary

  • Roll — Roll, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rolled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rolling}.] [OF. roeler, roler, F. rouler, LL. rotulare, fr. L. royulus, rotula, a little wheel, dim. of rota wheel; akin to G. rad, and to Skr. ratha car, chariot. Cf. {Control}, {Roll}, n.,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Roll — bezeichnet: Personen: Alfred Philippe Roll (1847–1919), französischer Maler Christine Roll (* 1960) deutsche Historikerin Eric Roll, Lord Roll of Ipsden (1907–2005), britischer Wirtschaftswissenschaftler und Bankier Gernot Roll (* 1939),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Roll — Roll, n. [F. r[^o]le a roll (in sense 3), fr. L. rotulus ? little wheel, LL., a roll, dim. of L. rota a wheel. See {Roll}, v., and cf. {R[^o]le}, {Rouleau}, {Roulette}.] 1. The act of rolling, or state of being rolled; as, the roll of a ball; the …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • roll — [rəʊl ǁ roʊl] verb roll something → back phrasal verb [transitive] COMMERCE to reduce the price of something to a previous level: • the administration s promise to roll back taxes roll in phrasal verb [intransitive] …   Financial and business terms

  • Roll It — Roll It/Roll It Gal Alison Hinds J Status feat. Rihanna Shontelle Shontelle Veröffentlichung 18. März 2007 Länge 3:58 Genre(s) Reggae, R B …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • roll — [n1] revolving, turning cycle, gyration, reel, revolution, rotation, run, spin, trundling, turn, twirl, undulation, whirl; concepts 147,201 roll [n2] cylindrical object ball, barrel, bobbin, cartouche, coil, cone, convolution, cornucopia,… …   New thesaurus

  • roll — n 1: a document containing an official record 2: an official list the public relief roll s: as a: a list of members of a legislative body the clerk called the roll and recorded the votes b: a list of prac …   Law dictionary

  • roll on — May (a specified event) come quickly • • • Main Entry: ↑roll * * * roll on british spoken phrase used for saying that you wish something would happen soon Roll on the summer holidays! Thesaurus: expressions of hope …   Useful english dictionary

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.