Roads


Roads
This interesting surname, chiefly found in Yorkshire and Lancashire, is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and may be either a topographical name for someone who lived by a clearing in woodland, from the Olde English pre 7th Century "rod", clearing, or a locational name from any of the places named with this word. These places include: Rhodes near Middleton in Lancashire; Rhodes (Hill), north of Ashton-under-Lyme; Rhodes (Bank) near Oldham; and Rhodes (Green), north of Wakefield in the West Riding of Yorkshire. Topographical features, whether natural or man-made, provided obvious and convenient means of identification in the small communities of the Middle Ages, and consequently gave rise to several surnames. Locational names were developed when former inhabitants of a place moved to another area, usually to seek work, and were best identified by the name of their birthplace. Early examples of the surname include: Alexander de la rode (Norfolk, 1277); John atte Rode (Bedfordshire, 1294); and Robert del Rodes (Lancashire, 1332). Cecil John Rhodes (1853 - 1902) was a British colonial financier and statesman in South Africa. As Prime Minister of the Cape Colony (1890 - 1896), he helped to extend British territory. A Coat of Arms granted to the family is a silver shield, a red lion passant quardant between two acorns in bend azure cotised ermines, a trefoil for difference. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugh de Rodes, which was dated 1219, witness in the "Assize Court Rolls of Yorkshire", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • roads — roads; roads·man; …   English syllables

  • roads —    In the absence of significant inland waterways, and with a deficient rail network (see also railways), roads have come to carry the bulk of all land based passenger and freight traffic in Spain. Across the system the quality of road connection …   Encyclopedia of contemporary Spanish culture

  • roads —    Long before any human made roads were built in Mesopotamia, people used the rivers to travel long distances. If they had to journey overland, they used donkeys, and later camels and horses, and followed the routes that were physically easiest …   Ancient Mesopotamia dictioary

  • Roads — (as used in expressions) Hampton Roads Hampton Roads, batalla de Hampton Roads, conferencia de …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • roads — Essential for trade and travel in Palestine; roads went from north to south along the coast, and further inland between the hills, with branches into Galilee. Roman highways were kept in good repair and greatly facilitated Paul s journeys,… …   Dictionary of the Bible

  • Roads —    BL Government makes provision for, in 1841, 98 99; winter roads at Quebec, 146 147. See also Yonge Street; Dundas Street; Baldoon Road …   The makers of Canada

  • roads — plural of road …   Dictionary of ichthyology

  • ROADS — Robust Open Architecture Distributed Switching (SONET) …   Acronyms

  • ROADS — Robust Open Architecture Distributed Switching (SONET) …   Acronyms von A bis Z

  • roads — rəʊd n. avenue, street, paved or packed surface designed for travel; path, way; roadstead, protected area for ships to anchor; railway, train track …   English contemporary dictionary


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