Rabbet


Rabbet
This unusual and intriguing surname is of early medieval English origin, and has two possible derivations, both from Old Germanic personal names. Firstly, Rabbatts can be a diminutive form of Rabb, which is a short, "pet" form of the male given name Robert, a Germanic name composed of the elements "hrod", renown and "berht", bright, famous. The Normans adopted the name and introduced it to England after the Conquest of 1066, and it quickly became a popular male given name generating a number of variants and derivative surnames. Secondly, Rabbatts may derive from the Germanic personal name "Radbodo", Rabbodo", composed of the elements "rad", counsel, advice and "bodo", message, tidings. This was also introduced by the Normans as "Radbode" and "Rabbode" and is so recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. The "-s" ending indicates that the name is a patronymic. The name development includes Andrew Robat (1279, Huntingdonshire), Thomas Robot (1327, Cambridge) and Reginald Rabbet (1524, Suffolk). Joseph Samuel, son of Thomas and Catherine Rabbatts, was christened on December 14th 1827 at St. Alphage, Greenwich, Kent. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Philip Rabot, which was dated circa 1260, in the "Charters relating to the Gilbertine Houses (Lincolnshire)", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Rabbet — Rab bet, n. [See {Rabbet}, v., and cf. {Rebate}, n.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Carp.) A longitudinal channel, groove, or recess cut out of the edge or face of any body; especially, one intended to receive another member, so as to break or cover the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rabbet — Rab bet, n. [See {Rabbet}, v., and cf. {Rebate}, n.] [1913 Webster] 1. (Carp.) A longitudinal channel, groove, or recess cut out of the edge or face of any body; especially, one intended to receive another member, so as to break or cover the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rabbet — [rab′it] n. [ME rabet < OFr rabat, rabbat, a beating down < rabattre: see REBATE1] a groove or recess cut in the edge of a board, plank, etc. in such a way that another piece may be fitted into it to form a joint (rabbet joint) vt. 1. to… …   English World dictionary

  • Rabbet — Rab bet (r[a^]b b[e^]t), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Rabbeted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Rabbeting}.] [F. raboter to plane, plane down,rabot a plane; pref. re re + OF. abouter, aboter. See {Abut}, and cf. {Rebut}.] 1. To cut a rabbet in; to furnish with a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • rabbet — (n.) rectangular groove cut in a piece of timber, late 14c., from O.Fr. rabbat a recess in a wall, lit. a beating down, from rabattre beat down, beat back (see REBATE (Cf. rebate)). The verb is attested from 1560s …   Etymology dictionary

  • Rabbet — A rabbet (also known as rebate) is a recess or groove cut into the edge of a piece of machineable material, usually wood. When viewed in cross section, a rabbet is two sided and open to the edge or end of the surface into which it is cut.The… …   Wikipedia

  • rabbet — I. noun Etymology: Middle English rabet, perhaps from Middle French rabat act of forcing down, from Old French rabattre to force down, fold over, reduce more at rebate Date: 14th century a channel, groove, or recess cut out of the edge or face of …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • rabbet — /rab it/, n., v., rabbeted, rabbeting. n. 1. a deep notch formed in or near one edge of a board, framing timber, etc., so that something else can be fitted into it or so that a door or the like can be closed against it. 2. a broad groove let into …   Universalium

  • rabbet — rab•bet [[t]ˈræb ɪt[/t]] n. 1) bui a deep notch formed in or near one edge of a board, framing timber, etc., so that something else can be fitted into it or so that a door or the like can be closed against it 2) bui to cut a rabbet in (a board or …   From formal English to slang

  • rabbet — n. & v. n. a step shaped channel etc. cut along the edge or face or projecting angle of a length of wood etc., usu. to receive the edge or tongue of another piece. v.tr. (rabbeted, rabbeting) 1 join or fix with a rabbet. 2 make a rabbet in.… …   Useful english dictionary

  • rabbet — 1. noun A longitudinal channel, groove, or recess cut out of the edge or face of a plank of wood or other material; especially, one intended to fit another member to form a joint. 2. verb To cut a rabbet in a piece of material …   Wiktionary


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