Pounder


Pounder
Recorded in at least four spelling forms Pound, Pounder, Pounds, Pund, and possibly an overlap with the surname Pond or Ponde, this is an English medieval surname. It may be locational and as such describes a person who lived by a pound, or came from a place called Pound, of which there are several examples around the country. The origin is the Olde English pre 7th century 'pund', the later pound. This was a walled enclosure, usually round with one entrance, and of which a number of fine examples still exist, where stray animals were 'impounded' until collected by their owners, who then had to pay a fine to the Pounder, a job descriptive surname. An alternative occupational origin which will certainly apply to some nameholders, is that the name describes a skilled iron worker, one who was responsible for manufacturing the ancient weights and measures known as 'pounds'. The derivation being again from a word spelt 'pund', although obviously the meaning is quite different. The surname is perhaps not surprisingly very early. Ralph le Pundere being recorded in the pipe rolls of the county of Westmoreland in the year 1176, whilst William Punder is recorded in the Curia Regis rolls for Yorksire in 1212. An early example of the surname with an occupational origin that is the keeper of a pound, is that of William Pund of Kent in 1206, whilst a first recording with a locational origin is possibly that of Ralph de Punda of the county of Hampshire in the tax rolls known as 'The Feet of Fines' in 1242. Nicholas Attepounde was recorded in Oxford in 1276, whilst in 1279 in the famous Hundred Rolls, Stephen Pound was recorded as a landowner in the county of Kent.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pounder — Pound er, n. 1. One who, or that which, pounds, as a stamp in an ore mill. [1913 Webster] 2. An instrument used for pounding; a pestle. [1913 Webster] 3. A person or thing, so called with reference to a certain number of pounds in value, weight,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pounder — [ paundər ] suffix used with a number to show the weight of something in pounds a. a quarter pounder/half pounder a BURGER that weighs a quarter/half of a pound …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • -pounder — UK [paʊndə(r)] US [paʊndər] suffix used with a number to show the weight of something in pounds Thesaurus: weight and describing weighthyponym general words for heavy thingssynonym Phrases …   Useful english dictionary

  • -pounder — [poun′dər] combining form something weighing or worth (a specified number of) pounds: used in hyphenated compounds [five pounder] * * * …   Universalium

  • -pounder — [poun′dər] combining form something weighing or worth (a specified number of) pounds: used in hyphenated compounds [five pounder] …   English World dictionary

  • pounder — [poun′dər] n. a person or thing that pounds …   English World dictionary

  • Pounder — CCH Pounder (links) Carol Christine Hilaria Pounder (* 25. Dezember 1952 in Guyana) ist eine Film und Fernsehschauspielerin. Ihr Filmdebut lieferte sie in dem preisgekrönten Film All That Jazz ab. Danach hatte sie in vielen anderen erfolgreichen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • pounder —   Mea ku i.    ♦ Poi pounder, pōhaku ku i ai, pōhaku ku i poi.    ♦ Ring poi pounder, pōhaku ku i ai puka.    ♦ Whale tooth pounder, pōhaku ku i palaoa.    ♦ Top of poi pounder, pōheoheo …   English-Hawaiian dictionary

  • pounder — pound|er [ˈpaundə US ər] n a 3 pounder/24 pounder/185 pounder etc a) an animal, fish, or person that weighs 3 pounds, 24 pounds etc b) a gun that fires a ↑shell that weighs 3 pounds, 24 pounds etc …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • pounder — pounder1 /pown deuhr/, n. a person or thing that pounds, pulverizes, or beats. [bef. 1050; OE punere pestle (not found in ME); see POUND1, ER1] pounder2 /pown deuhr/, n. 1. a person or thing having or associated with a weight or value of a pound… …   Universalium


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