Pile


Pile
This unusual name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a topographical surname given in the first instances to someone who lived near a stake or post which had been placed to serve as a landmark or boundary marker. The derivation is from the Olde English pre 7th Century "pil", stake, post, from the Latin "pilum", spike, javelin, in Middle English "pile". Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. Early examples of the surname include: Robert Pile, in the Somersetshire Assize Court Rolls of 1243; Robert Attepile, in the Somerset Hundred Rolls of 1274; and Walter atte Pyle, listed in the Exchequer Lay Subsidy Rolls of 1327. The modern forms of the name are Pile or Pyle, and among the recordings in Church Registers are those of the christening of Alice Pile, at St. Andrew's, Holborn, London, on September 23rd 1561, and the marriage of Thomas Pile and Anne Bennett on January 30th 1590, in Clyst Hydon, Devonshire. A Coat of Arms granted to a family of the name depicts a red cross between four red nails on a silver shield. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Henry de la Pil, which was dated 1221, in the "Calendar of Patent Rolls of Somersetshire", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • pile — pile …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • pilé — pilé …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • pile — 1. (pi l ) s. f. 1°   Amas de choses placées les unes sur les autres. •   Leurs débris sont couverts d une pile de morts, MAIRET Mort d Asdrub. I, 3. •   Ils [la famille de M. le Prince] eurent tant de peur qu on ne s excusât faute de manteaux,… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Pile — Pile, n. [F. pile, L. pila a pillar, a pier or mole of stone. Cf. {Pillar}.] 1. A mass of things heaped together; a heap; as, a pile of stones; a pile of wood. [1913 Webster] 2. A mass formed in layers; as, a pile of shot. [1913 Webster] 3. A… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pile — Pile, n. [AS. p[=i]l arrow, stake, L. pilum javelin; but cf. also L. pila pillar.] 1. A large stake, or piece of timber, pointed and driven into the earth, as at the bottom of a river, or in a harbor where the ground is soft, for the support of a …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pile — may refer to:*Pile foundation, type of deep foundation *Pile (textile), fabric with raised surface made of upright loops or strands of yarn ** Carpet pile * Nuclear pile, early term for a nuclear reactor, typically one constructed of graphite *… …   Wikipedia

  • Pile — ist der Name mehrerer Personen: Frederick Alfred Pile (1884–1976), britischer General im zweiten Weltkrieg William Anderson Pile (1829–1889), US amerikanischer General und Politiker Pile bezeichnet außerdem: Chicago Pile, den ersten Kernreaktor… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • pile — Ⅰ. pile UK US /paɪl/ noun [C] ► a large amount of something: »a pile of cash/money »consumers with piles of credit card debt » I have piles of paperwork to finish. ● at the bottom/top of the pile Cf. at the top of the pile → See also …   Financial and business terms

  • pile — Ⅰ. pile [1] ► NOUN 1) a heap of things laid or lying one on top of another. 2) informal a large amount. 3) a large imposing building. ► VERB 1) place (things) one on top of the other. 2) ( …   English terms dictionary

  • pile on — ● pile * * * pile on [phrasal verb] 1 pile on (something) : to put a large amount of (something) on something or someone He piled on the gravy. The teacher punished the class by piling on more work. [=the teacher punished the class by giving them …   Useful english dictionary

  • Pile — Pile, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Piled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Piling}.] 1. To lay or throw into a pile or heap; to heap up; to collect into a mass; to accumulate; to amass; often with up; as, to pile up wood. Hills piled on hills. Dryden. Life piled on… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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