Pickle
This interesting name is of early medieval English origin, and is from a topographical surname for someone who lived by a small field or paddock. The name derives from the Middle English word "pightel, pighel", small enclosure, field, or paddock. Topographical names were among the earliest group of surnames to be created in England and other countries in Europe, as they became necessary, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided instant and easily recognisable identifying names for the inhabitants of the small communities of the Middle Ages. The modern surname can be found as Pickles, Pickless, Pickle and Pighills, and is found recorded mainly in Yorkshire. The marriage of Thomas Pickles and Sarah Tennard was recorded in Bingley, Yorkshire, on January 28th 1649. One R. Pickles, a famine emigrant, sailed from Liverpool aboard the "New World" bound for New York on June 7th 1847. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard de Righkeleys, which was dated 1379, in the "Poll Tax Returns of Yorkshire", during the reign of King Richard 11, known as "Richard of Bordeaux", 1377 - 1399. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Synonyms:
(for preserving meat), / (for preserving meats or vegetables) / , , (colloq.)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pickle — or pickling may refer to: Food * Pickling, the process of preserving a food by soaking and storing it in vinegar or brine, which has been going on for five thousand years. * Pickled cucumber, a food most commonly referred to as a pickle in the… …   Wikipedia

  • Pickle — Pic kle, n. [Cf. D. pekel. Probably a dim. fr. {Pick}, v. t., alluding to the cleaning of the fish.] 1. (a) A solution of salt and water, in which fish, meat, etc., may be preserved or corned; brine. (b) Vinegar, plain or spiced, used for… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pickle — Pic kle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pickled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pickling}.] 1. To preserve or season in pickle; to treat with some kind of pickle; as, to pickle herrings or cucumbers. [1913 Webster] 2. To give an antique appearance to; said of copies or …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pickle — bezeichnet: eingelegtes Gemüse (engl.), siehe Einlegen Indisches Pickle Branston Pickle, ein britischer Markenname einer vegetarischen Würzsoße aus Obst oder Gemüse eine Serialisierungsbibliothek der Programmiersprache Python, sowie den Prozess… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • pickle — ► NOUN 1) a relish consisting of vegetables or fruit preserved in vinegar, brine, or mustard. 2) liquid used to preserve food or other perishable items. 3) (a pickle) informal a difficult situation. ► VERB 1) preserve (food) in pickle. 2) ( …   English terms dictionary

  • pickle — [n] sticky situation bind, box*, corner*, difficulty, dilemma, disorder, fix, hole*, hot water*, jam*, predicament, quandary, scrape, spot*, tight spot*; concept 674 Ant. boon, pleasure pickle [v] preserve fruit or vegetable can, cure, keep,… …   New thesaurus

  • pickle — [pik′əl] n. [ME pikil < MDu pekel < ? picken, to prick, in sense “that which pricks, or is piquant”] 1. any brine, vinegar, or spicy solution used to preserve or marinate food 2. a vegetable, specif. a cucumber, preserved in such a solution …   English World dictionary

  • Pickle — Pic kle, n. [Obs.] See {Picle}. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Pickle — Pickle. См. Травление. (Источник: «Металлы и сплавы. Справочник.» Под редакцией Ю.П. Солнцева; НПО Профессионал , НПО Мир и семья ; Санкт Петербург, 2003 г.) …   Словарь металлургических терминов

  • pickle — index imbroglio Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • pickle — n *predicament, plight, dilemma, quandary, scrape, fix, jam …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

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