Motion


Motion
This most interesting surname is acknowledged to be Scottish in its modern spelling form, and has been so far at least two centuries, however its origins may lie elsewhere. It appears to derive from the Latin "Motio" which means "Motion", a word also used in the French, and was probably a form of nickname for "a messenger or courier". As such it may be Huguenot, but this is not confirmed. It could also be habitational and derive from "Motte-tun" or similar (Old English pre 7th Century and describe one who lived at a farm (tun) by a fort or meeting place. An example would be Sir Robert Moton who died at Leicester in 1497. As "Motion" the name spelling is 18th Century (see below), earlier recordings may be undiscovered. Examples include James Motion christened at Port Glasgow, Renfrew on June 20th 1799, and his brother Alexander christened on May 24th 1801, whilst Mary Motion was christened at Stevenston, Ayr on November 16th 1801, in London the first recording was on September 19th 1813, when Thomas Motion married Isabella Turn Bull, at St. James Church Garlickhythe. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of George Motion, which was dated May 14th 1785, married Martha Bell at Edinburgh, during the reign of King George 111, "Farmer George", 1760 - 1820. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Synonyms:

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  • motion — mo·tion 1 n [Anglo French, from Latin motion motio movement, from movēre to move] 1: a proposal for action; esp: a formal proposal made in a legislative assembly made a motion to refer the bill to committee 2 a: an application made to a court or… …   Law dictionary

  • motion — [ mosjɔ̃ ] n. f. • XIIIe; lat. motio 1 ♦ Vx Action de mouvoir (⇒ impulsion); mouvement. ♢ (sens repris au XXe) Psychan. Motion pulsionnelle : la pulsion en tant que modification psychique (pulsion en acte). 2 ♦ (1775; angl. motion) Mod …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Motion — Mo tion, n. [F., fr. L. motio, fr. movere, motum, to move. See {Move}.] 1. The act, process, or state of changing place or position; movement; the passing of a body from one place or position to another, whether voluntary or involuntary; opposed… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Motion — may refer to: Motion (physics), any movement or change in position or place .... Motion (legal), a procedural device in law to bring a limited, contested matter before a court Motion (democracy), a formal step to introduce a matter for… …   Wikipedia

  • motion — n Motion, movement, move, locomotion, stir mean the act or an instance of moving. Motion is the appropriate term in abstract use for the act or process of moving, without regard to what moves or is moved; in philosophical and aesthetic use it is… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • motion — mo‧tion [ˈməʊʆn ǁ ˈmoʊ ] noun [countable] a suggestion that is made formally at a meeting and then decided on by voting: • The motion was carried (= accepted ) by 15 votes to 10. • I d like to propose a motion to move the weekly meetings to… …   Financial and business terms

  • Motion — Mo tion, v. t. 1. To direct or invite by a motion, as of the hand or head; as, to motion one to a seat. [1913 Webster] 2. To propose; to move. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] I want friends to motion such a matter. Burton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • motion — [n1] movement, action act, advance, agitation, ambulation, body English*, change, changing, direction, drift, dynamics, flow, fluctuation, flux, full swing*, gesticulation, gesture, high sign*, inclination, kinetics, locomotion, mobility,… …   New thesaurus

  • motion — [mō′shən] n. [ME mocioun < L motio (gen. motionis), a moving < motus, pp. of movere,MOVE] 1. the act or process of moving; passage of a body from one place to another; movement 2. the act of moving the body or any of its parts 3. a… …   English World dictionary

  • Motion — Mo tion, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Motioned}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Motioning}.] 1. To make a significant movement or gesture, as with the hand; as, to motion to one to take a seat. [1913 Webster] 2. To make proposal; to offer plans. [Obs.] Shak. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • motion — A request filed with the Court for a specific action to be taken. (Bernstein s Dictionary of Bankruptcy Terminology) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012. motion A request filed with the Court for a specific action to be taken …   Glossary of Bankruptcy


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