Marjoram


Marjoram
Recorded in many forms including Margeram, Margram, Margarum, Margrem, and Marjoram, this is an English surname. It has been claimed that in England it originates from the region known as East Anglia and more specifically the county of Norfolk, although we have not been able to provide any early evidence as such. We do know that it is a surname which is derived from a herb called "majorane or mageram", and this may have been introduced by the Romans in the First Century a.d., and perhaps again by the Norman French after the Invasion of 1066. The plant was apparently in considerable demand in the medieval times, and it would seem formed an ingredient within the many potions and pottages used for the attempted cure of the various plagues and diseases. This suggests that the name was occupational for a herbalist, the most successful healers before the invention of plumbing and sanitation. We are able to show that the name was relatively popular in the diocese of Greater London from the 17th century, and it may well be that other epicentres exist within the British Isles that we have not yet identified. These examples of recordings include Elizabeth Margrem who married James Morns at St Botolphs Bishopgate, on April 2nd 1656, Ann Margerum, who was christened at St Sepulchre church, on March 28th 1680, and Ann Marjoram, christened at St Helens Bishopgate, on April 28th 1769.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Marjoram — Mar jo*ram (m[aum]r j[ o]*ram), n. [OE. majoran, F. marjolaine, LL. marjoraca, fr. L. amaracus, amaracum, Gr. ama rakos, ama rakon.] (Bot.) A genus of mintlike plants ({Origanum}) comprising about twenty five species. The sweet marjoram… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • marjoram — ► NOUN 1) (also sweet marjoram) an aromatic plant of the mint family, used as a herb in cooking. 2) (also wild marjoram) another term for OREGANO(Cf. ↑oregano). ORIGIN Latin majorana …   English terms dictionary

  • marjoram — [mär′jə rəm] n. [ME majoran < OFr majorane < ML maiorana, prob. altered < L amaracus < Gr amarakos, marjoram: of Indic orig., akin to Sans maruva ] any of a number of perennial plants of the mint family, esp. sweet marjoram …   English World dictionary

  • marjoram — late 14c., from O.Fr. majorane (13c., Mod.Fr. marjolaine), from M.L. maiorana, of uncertain origin, probably ultimately from India (Cf. Skt. maruva marjoram ), with form influenced by L. major greater …   Etymology dictionary

  • Marjoram —   [ mɑːdʒərəm], J., Pseudonym des englischen Schriftstellers Ralph Hale Mottram …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Marjoram — For the Galaxy Angel Rune Character(s), see Kahlua Marjoram and Tequila Marjoram. Marjoram Scientific classification Kingdom …   Wikipedia

  • marjoram — /mahr jeuhr euhm/, n. any of several aromatic herbs belonging to the genus Origanum, of the mint family, esp. O. majorana (sweet marjoram), having leaves used as seasoning in cooking. Cf. oregano. [1350 1400; ME majorane < ML majorana, var. of… …   Universalium

  • marjoram — [ mα:dʒ(ə)rəm] noun 1》 (also sweet marjoram) an aromatic southern European plant of the mint family, the leaves of which are used as a herb. [Origanum majorana.] 2》 (also wild marjoram) another term for oregano. Origin ME: from OFr. majorane,… …   English new terms dictionary

  • marjoram — mar•jo•ram [[t]ˈmɑr dʒər əm[/t]] n. pln any of several aromatic herbs of the mint family, esp. Origanum majorana (sweet marjoram), having leaves used as a seasoning. • Etymology: 1350–1400; < ML majorana, var. of majoraca, alter. of L amāracus …   From formal English to slang

  • marjoram — n. either of two aromatic herbs, Origanum vulgare (wild marjoram) or Majorana hortensis (sweet marjoram), the fresh or dried leaves of which are used as a flavouring in cookery. Etymology: ME & OF majorane f. med.L majorana, of unkn. orig …   Useful english dictionary


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