Lead


Lead
Recorded as Leed, Leeds, Lead, Leads, Leades, Leedes, Ledes, and possibly others, this is an English locational surname. In most cases name holders will have originated from the city of Leeds in West Yorkshire, this place having been recorded in 730 a.d. by the Venerable Bede (675 - 735 a.d.), generally accepted as the first English historian. At the time the region was known as Loidis or Ledes, and only much later in the famous Domesday Book of 1086 did this refer to the city of "Ledes", on its own. There is considerable argument as to the origin of the name, but it is almost certainly to do with water, perhaps from the Germanic word "flodus" meaning river, with Leeds itself standing on a flood plain formed by several rivers. Locational surnames are usually "from" names. That is to say names given to people as easy identification after they left their original homes to move somewhere else. However it also possible that some name holders originate from the village of Leeds in Kent. This is first recorded at Esledes in the Domesday Book of 1086 and as Lhedes in 1238. The derivation is from "hylde" meaning loud, possibly a reference to a waterfall or ravine. Early examples of the surname recording include Alexander Ledes of Gipton in Yorkshire, whose daughter Elizabeth was baptised there in the year 1336, Elizabeth Leeds who was buried at St Michaels Cornhilll in the city of London in 1565, whilst Edward Leedes of the county of Sussex was a student at Oxford University in 1575.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Lead — (pronEng|ˈlɛd) is a main group element with a symbol Pb ( la. plumbum). Lead has the atomic number 82. Lead is a soft, malleable poor metal, also considered to be one of the heavy metals. Lead has a bluish white color when freshly cut, but… …   Wikipedia

  • Lead — (l[e^]d), n. [OE. led, leed, lead, AS. le[ a]d; akin to D. lood, MHG. l[=o]t, G. loth plummet, sounding lead, small weight, Sw. & Dan. lod. [root]123.] 1. (Chem.) One of the elements, a heavy, pliable, inelastic metal, having a bright, bluish… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • lead — lead1 [lēd] vt. led, leading [ME leden < OE lædan, caus. of lithan, to travel, go, akin to Ger leiten: for IE base see LOAD] 1. a) to show the way to, or direct the course of, by going before or along with; conduct; guide b) to show (the way)… …   English World dictionary

  • lead — Ⅰ. lead [1] ► VERB (past and past part. led) 1) cause (a person or animal) to go with one, especially by drawing them along or by preceding them to a destination. 2) be a route or means of access: the street led into the square. 3) (lead to)… …   English terms dictionary

  • Lead — (l[=e]d), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Led} (l[e^]d); p. pr. & vb. n. {Leading}.] [OE. leden, AS. l[=ae]dan (akin to OS. l[=e]dian, D. leiden, G. leiten, Icel. le[imac][eth]a, Sw. leda, Dan. lede), properly a causative fr. AS. li[eth]an to go; akin to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lead — Lead, n. 1. The act of leading or conducting; guidance; direction; as, to take the lead; to be under the lead of another. [1913 Webster] At the time I speak of, and having a momentary lead, . . . I am sure I did my country important service.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lead — 〈[ li:d] n. 15; Mus.〉 Führungsstimme in einer Jazzband od. Popgruppe [zu engl. lead „führen“] * * * Lead [li:d ], das; [s], s [engl. lead, zu: to lead = (an)führen]: 1. <o. Pl.> führende ↑ Stimme (3 b) in einer [Jazz]band ( …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Lead — (von engl. to lead = „(an)führen“, [liːd]) hat unterschiedliche Bedeutungen: Lead (Titularbistum) Eine Stadt in der Nähe von Rapid City, siehe Lead (South Dakota). Leadklettern; Variante des Sportkletterns Marketing / Vertrieb: Die erfolgreiche… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • lead — 1 vt led, lead·ing: to suggest the desired answer to (a witness) by asking leading questions lead 2 n: something serving as a tip, indication, or clue the police have only one lead in the murder investigation Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law.… …   Law dictionary

  • lead — lead, led Lead is the present tense of the verb meaning ‘to go in front’, ‘to take charge of’, etc., and its past form is led. A common mistake is to use lead for the past form and pronounce it led in speech, probably on the false analogy of read …   Modern English usage

  • lead — [n1] first place, supremacy advance, advantage, ahead, bulge, cutting edge*, direction, edge, example, facade, front rank, guidance, head, heavy, leadership, margin, model, over, pilot, point, precedence, primacy, principal, priority, protagonist …   New thesaurus


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