Liger


Liger
This most interesting surname is of Old German origin, and derives from a Germanic personal name composed of the elements "liut", tribe, people, and "gari, geri", spear. The popularity of this personal name was due to a 7th Century bishop of Autun, in France, who bore the name; he was martyred for political rather than religious reasons. In Germany the name was connected with another saint who was an 8th Century bishop of Munster. From this source also derive the English surnames Ledger and Leger; Legier, Laugier and Liger in France; and Luttger and Luttgert in Germany. The personal name was introduced into England in the form "Legier" by Norman settlers. However, in some instances the surname may perhaps derive from an occupational name for a doctor or physician, from the Old German "lauge", leech, as this was given to one skilled in medicine or "leechcraft", one who relieves pain. Early examples of the surname include the christening of Pierre Lauga on February 21st 1736, at Montigny, Meurthe-et-Moselle, France; the marriage of Peter Lauga and Mary Hurst on August 28th 1766, at Alverstoke, Hampshire; and the marriage of Martha Lauga and John Thompson on January 11th 1802, at Westminster, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Martin and Anna Laug, which was dated September 1682, christening witnesses at Pfalz, Battenburg, Wuertt, Germany, during the reign of Emperor Leopold 1, Holy Roman Emperor, 1658 - 1705. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Liger —   [englisch, gekürzt aus lion »Löwe« und tiger »Tiger«] der, s/ , Bastard aus Kreuzung zwischen Löwenmännchen und Tigerweibchen; meist mit blasser Tigerzeichnung und (beim Männchen) mit löwenähnlicher Mähne. (Tigon) * * * Li|ger, der; s, [engl.… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Liger — (a. Geogr.), Fluß in Gallien, entsprung auf den Cevennen, strömte durch das Land der Arverner[372] u. Carnuter, nahm rechts die Meduana u. links den Elaver auf u. mündete an der Westküste zwischen dem Lande der Pictonen u. Namneten in den… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Liger — Liger, antiker Name der Loire …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • LIGER — Rutuli cuiusdam nomen, fratris Lucani, quem Aeneas Turni auspicia sequentem interfecit. Virg. Aen. l. 10. v. 576. et 580 …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Liger — Variante de Léger (voir ce nom) portée notamment dans le Loiret et le Loir et Cher. Formes voisines : Ligey (70), Liget (72, 80), Ligez. Diminutifs : Ligereau, Ligeret (72), Ligeron (89, 71), Ligerot (71, 70, 76) …   Noms de famille

  • liger — [lī′gər] n. [ LI(ON) + (TI)GER] the offspring of a male lion and a female tiger …   English World dictionary

  • Liger — Taxobox image caption = regnum = Animalia phylum = Chordata classis = Mammalia ordo = Carnivora familia = Felidae genus = Panthera species = binomial = binomial authority = (Linnaeus, 1758) The liger, is a hybrid cross between a male lion and a… …   Wikipedia

  • Liger — Dieser Liger weist sowohl eine kleine Löwenmähne als auch schwach ausgeprägte Tigerstreifen auf. Liger sind Hybride, die aus der Kreuzung eines männlichen Löwen (Panthera leo) und eines weiblichen Tigers (Panthera tigris) hervorgehen. Es… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Liger — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. Liger peut faire référence à : Liger, une rivière française, affluent de la Bresle, Liger, le nom anglais du ligre, hybride du lion et du tigre,… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • liger — /luy geuhr/, n. the offspring of a male lion and a female tiger. Cf. tiglon. [1935 40; LI(ON) + (TI)GER] * * * ▪ mammal       offspring of a lion and a tigress. The liger is a zoo bred hybrid, as is the tigon, the result of mating a tiger with a… …   Universalium


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