Knock


Knock
This surname, of Scottish, Irish or English origin, is either a topographical name for someone, who lived on a hilltop, derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "cnocc" (Gaelic "cnoc"), meaning "round-topped hill", or a locational name from one of the places called Knock in Scotland and Northern England. Topographical surnames were among the earliest created, since both natural and man-made features in the landscape provided easily recognisable distinguishing names in the small communities of the Middle Ages. While locational surnames were developed when former inhabitants of a place moved to another area, usually to seek work, and were best identified by the name of their birthplace. The surname dates back to the late 13th Century (see below), and other early recordings include: Nicholas Knok in the 1279 Hundred Rolls of Bedfordshire, and Thomas atte Knocke in the 1296 Subsidy Rolls of Sussex. In the modern idiom the surname can be found recorded as Knock, Knox, Knocker and Nock. Recordings from London Church Registers include: the marriage of Katheryne Nockes and Arthur Lloide on May 25th 1576, at St. James' Clerkenwell; the christening of Joseph, son of Thomas and Angel Knock, on December 15th 1691, at St. Giles' Cripplegate; and the marriage of John Knock and Elizabeth Everard on June 18th 1645, at St. Mary's, Putney. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of John de (of) Cnoc or Knoc, charter witness, which was dated 1260, in the "Records of Renfrewshire", Scotland, during the reign of King Alexander 111 of Scotland, 1249 - 1286. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Synonyms:
(as at a door), / , , , , , (as at a door), , , , ,


Look at other dictionaries:

  • knock — ► VERB 1) strike a surface noisily to attract attention. 2) collide forcefully with. 3) force to move or fall with a collision or blow. 4) make (a hole, dent, etc.) in something by striking it. 5) informal criticize. 6) (of a motor) make a… …   English terms dictionary

  • knock — [näk] vi. [ME knokken < OE cnocian, akin to ON knoka, MHG knochen, to press < echoic base > KNACK] 1. to strike a blow or blows with the fist or some hard object; esp., to rap on a door 2. to bump; collide; clash 3. to make a thumping,… …   English World dictionary

  • Knock — (n[o^]k), v. t. 1. To strike with something hard or heavy; to move by striking; to drive (a thing) against something; as, to knock a ball with a bat; to knock the head against a post; to knock a lamp off the table. [1913 Webster] When heroes… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Knock — (n[o^]k), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Knocked} (n[o^]kt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Knocking}.] [OE. knoken, AS. cnocian, cnucian; prob. of imitative origin; cf. Sw. knacka. Cf. {Knack}.] 1. To drive or be driven against something; to strike against something;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Knock — ist der Name einer Landschaft in der Nähe von Emden, siehe: Knock (Ostfriesland) eines Marienwallfahrtsortes in Irland, County Mayo, siehe Knock (County Mayo) des in der Nähe gelegenen Flughafens Knock (Ireland West Airport Knock) eines Ortes in… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Knock — Knock, n. 1. A blow; a stroke with something hard or heavy; a jar. [1913 Webster] 2. A stroke, as on a door for admittance; a rap. A knock at the door. Longfellow. [1913 Webster] A loud cry or some great knock. Holland. [1913 Webster] {Knock off} …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Knock — Knock. Knock es una localidad de Irlanda situada en el condado de Mayo, provincia de Connacht, en la costa oeste de la isla. Tiene cerca de 600 habitantes. Es famosa porque se dice que aquí se aparecieron la Virgen María, san José, Jesús en forma …   Wikipedia Español

  • Knock-on — may refer to: *Knock on electron *Knock on (rugby) *Knock on effect …   Wikipedia

  • knock up — 1660s in sense of arouse by knocking at the door, from KNOCK (Cf. knock) (v.). However it is little used in this sense in American English, where the phrase means get a woman pregnant (1813), possibly ultimately from knock to copulate with… …   Etymology dictionary

  • knock — [n1] pushing, striking beating, blow, box, clip, conk, cuff, hammering, hit, injury, lick, rap, slap, smack, swat, swipe, thump, whack; concept 189 knock [n2] strong criticism blame, censure, condemnation, defeat, failure, flak, pan, rap, rebuff …   New thesaurus

  • knock in — [phrasal verb] knock (a run or runner) in or knock in (a run or runner) baseball : to cause (a run or runner) to score He knocked in [=batted in, drove in] a run in the second inning with a double to left field. • • • Main Entry: ↑knock …   Useful english dictionary


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