Fold


Fold
This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and can be either a topographical or an occupational surname deriving from the Old English pre 7th Century 'falod', 'fald', meaning 'fold', an enclosure or pen for sheep or cattle, in Middle English 'fold'. If a topographical surname, the name denotes residence near an enclosure or fold, for animals, and if an occupational surname, the meaning is 'worker at the fold(s) or cattle - pen(s)'. The surname development has introduced Adam le Fold (1327, Derbyshire), John atte Fold (1327, Somerset), Adam de Falde (1332, Staffordshire) and James Foulds (1584, Cheshire). The modern surname can be found as 'Fold', 'Foldes', 'Folds', 'Fould', 'Fouldes', 'Foulds', 'Fowlds' and 'Faulds'. The plural forms are genitive, meaning 'of the folds', and the surname in any form is usually found in the northern counties. On January 11th 1813, the marriage of Andrew Faulds and Elizabeth Jackson, took place at Barnsley, Yorkshire. William, son of Andrew and Elizabeth Faulds was christened on August 15th 1815, at Worsborough, Yorkshire. Robert and Ellen, twins of Thomas and Esther Faulds were christened at Christchurch, Southwark, London, on January 16th 1876. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Hugh del Foldis, which was dated 1275, in the Court Rolls of the Manor of Wakefield, Yorkshire, during the reign of King Edward 1, known as the Hammer of the Scots, 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • fold — fold·able; fold·age; fold; fold·less; in·fold; man·i·fold·er; man·i·fold·ly; man·i·fold·ness; mil·lion·fold; mul·ti·fold; one·fold; re·fold; re·fold·er; scaf·fold·age; scaf·fold·er; scaf·fold·ing; sev·en·fold·ed; tri·fold; twi·fold;… …   English syllables

  • Fold — Fold, n. [OE. fald, fold, AS. fald, falod.] 1. An inclosure for sheep; a sheep pen. [1913 Webster] Leaps o er the fence with ease into the fold. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A flock of sheep; figuratively, the Church or a church; as, Christ s fold.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Fold — (f[=o]ld), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Folded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Folding}.] [OE. folden, falden, AS. fealdan; akin to OHG. faltan, faldan, G. falten, Icel. falda, Dan. folde, Sw. f[*a]lla, Goth. fal[thorn]an, cf. Gr. di pla sios twofold, Skr. pu[.t]a a… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fold — fold1 [fōld] vt. [ME folden < OE faldan (WS fealdan), akin to Ger falten < IE * pel to < base * pel , to fold > (SIM)PLE, (TRI)PLE] 1. a) to bend or press (something) so that one part is over another; double up on itself [to fold a… …   English World dictionary

  • Fold — Fold, n. [From {Fold}, v. In sense 2 AS. feald, akin to fealdan to fold.] 1. A doubling,esp. of any flexible substance; a part laid over on another part; a plait; a plication. [1913 Webster] Mummies . . . shrouded in a number of folds of linen.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • fold — Ⅰ. fold [1] ► VERB 1) bend (something) over on itself so that one part of it covers another. 2) (often as adj. folding) be able to be folded into a flatter shape. 3) use (a soft or flexible material) to cover or wrap something in. 4)… …   English terms dictionary

  • fold — [fəʊld ǁ foʊld] also fold up verb [intransitive] ECONOMICS if a business folds or folds up, it stops operating or trading because it does not have enough money to continue: • The U.K. engineering firm has folded today with the loss of 30 jobs. •… …   Financial and business terms

  • Fold — Fold, v. i. To confine sheep in a fold. [R.] [1913 Webster] The star that bids the shepherd fold. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • -fold — [fəʊld ǁ foʊld] suffix a particular number of times: • The value of the house has increased fourfold in the last ten years (= it is now worth four times as much as it was ten years ago ) . * * * fold suffix ► having the stat …   Financial and business terms

  • fold — [n] double thickness bend, circumvolution, cockle, convolution, corrugation, crease, crimp, crinkle, dog’s ear*, flection, flexure, furrow, gather, gathering, groove, knife edge*, lap, lapel, layer, loop, overlap, plait, pleat, plica, plication,… …   New thesaurus

  • Fold — Fold, v. i. To become folded, plaited, or doubled; to close over another of the same kind; to double together; as, the leaves of the door fold. 1 Kings vi. 34. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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