Dutch


Dutch
This interesting surname originated from two possible sources. Firstly, it may be a variant of "Duche", itself from "Duchier", which is a French occupational name for a tavern-keeper, from an aphetic form of the old French "conduchier" (from the late Latin word "conducarius", to conduct, manage). Secondly, the name may have originated as a nickname given to immigrant Dutch weavers who were brought into England largely by Edward 111 to teach their craft and expand the English cloth trade, which became the source of so much wealth in the middle ages. They may also have been French Huguenots fleeing religious persecution in the late 16th Century (mainly Flemish) and the end of the late 17th Century. John Duch(e) was mentioned in the Court Rolls of Colchester in 1360. John, son of Thomas and Grace Dutche was christened at St. Mary Abbots, Kensington, London on November 30th 1576, while Bridgett Dutch married Robert Hayes at St. Giles Cripplegate, London on November 18th 1599. Jacques and Ester Duche, French Huguenots, had daughters Charlot and Elizabeth christened on July 18th 1686 and February 15th 1691 respectively, at Threadneedle street, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Walter de Deusshe, which was dated 1302, Close Rolls, during the reign of King Edward the 1, The Hammer of the Scots, 1272 - 1307. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Dutch — usually refers to: Something from or related to the Netherlands Dutch people, people from the Netherlands or their descendants Dutch language, spoken in the Netherlands, Belgium, Suriname, Curaçao, Aruba, Bonaire, Saba, Sint Maarten, and Sint… …   Wikipedia

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  • Dutch — (engl., über ndd.: dütsch, hd.: deutsch) bezeichnet folgende Sprachen: Berbice Dutch Creole, ausgestorbene Kreolsprache Jersey Dutch, Sprache niederländischer Einwanderer in New Jersey Niederländische Sprache (engl.: dutch language),… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Dutch — late 14c., used first of Germans generally, after c.1600 of Hollanders, from M.Du. duutsch, from O.H.G. duit isc, corresponding to O.E. þeodisc belonging to the people, used especially of the common language of Germanic people, from þeod people,… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Dutch — [duch] adj. [ME Duch < MDu Duutsch, Dutch, German, akin to Ger Deutsch: see DEUTSCHLAND] 1. of the Netherlands or its people, language, or culture ☆ 2. of the Pennsylvania Dutch or their language or culture n. the West Germanic language spoken …   English World dictionary

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  • dutch — dutch; dutch·i·fy; dutch·ly; dutch·man; Dutch; …   English syllables

  • Dutch — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ relating to the Netherlands or its language. ► NOUN ▪ the Germanic language of the Netherlands. ● go Dutch Cf. ↑go Dutch ORIGIN Dutch dutsch Dutch, Netherlandish, German …   English terms dictionary

  • Dutch — Dutch, n. 1. pl. The people of Holland; Dutchmen. [1913 Webster] 2. The language spoken in Holland. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dutch — ► NOUN (usu. one s old dutch) Brit. informal ▪ (among cockneys) one s wife. ORIGIN abbreviation of DUCHESS(Cf. ↑duchess) …   English terms dictionary

  • Dutch|er — «DUHCH uhr», noun. 1. = Dutchman (def. 2). (Cf. ↑Dutchman) 2. one of the Pennsylvania Dutch …   Useful english dictionary


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