Dust


Dust
This interesting surname of English origin derives from the Old English pre 7th Century "dust" meaning "dust", used to describe a person with a dust-coloured complexion or hair. Recordings include one Walter Dust (1203) "The Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire", and Robert le Doust (1316), witness, "The Feet of Fines, Kent". The term may also be used to describe a workman or a person with little worth. Recordings include one William Dustifot (1221) "The Assize Rolls of Worcestershire", and Thomas Dustiberd (1229), "The Calendar of the Patent Rolls, Somerset". Finally, it may also have an unexplained topographical term. One Richard del Doustes is recorded in "The Subsidy Rolls of Lancashire" in 1332. The surname dates back to the early 11th Century, (see below). Church records include one Roberte Duste who married Margery Heath at St. Giles Cripplegate, London, on September 3rd 1609, and Mary Dust married Francis Ffeild at St. Mary Whitechapel, London, on February 20th 1622. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Ulf Dust, which was dated circa 1030, Old English Bynames, during the reign of Canute, "King of England", 1016 - 1035. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Dust — (d[u^]st), n. [AS. dust; cf. LG. dust, D. duist meal dust, OD. doest, donst, and G. dunst vapor, OHG. tunist, dunist, a blowing, wind, Icel. dust dust, Dan. dyst mill dust; perh. akin to L. fumus smoke, E. fume. [root]71.] 1. Fine, dry particles… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dust — [dust] n. [ME < OE, akin to MLowG: for IE base see DUN1] 1. powdery earth or other matter in bits fine enough to be easily suspended in air 2. a cloud of such matter 3. confusion; turmoil 4. a) earth, esp. as the place of burial …   English World dictionary

  • dust — ► NOUN 1) fine, dry powder consisting of tiny particles of earth or waste matter. 2) any material in the form of tiny particles: coal dust. 3) an act of dusting. ► VERB 1) remove dust from the surface of. 2) cover lightly with a powdered… …   English terms dictionary

  • dust|y — «DUHS tee», adjective, dust|i|er, dust|i|est. 1. covered with dust; filled with dust: »He found some dusty old books in the attic. 2. like dust; dry and powdery: »dusty ch …   Useful english dictionary

  • Dust — (d[u^]st), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dusted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dusting}.] 1. To free from dust; to brush, wipe, or sweep away dust from; as, to dust a table or a floor. [1913 Webster] 2. To sprinkle with dust. [1913 Webster] 3. To reduce to a fine… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Dust — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Dust Álbum de Screaming Trees Publicación 1996 Grabación 1996 …   Wikipedia Español

  • dust|er — «DUHS tuhr», noun. 1. a person or thing that dusts. 2. a cloth, brush, or the like, used to get dust off things. 3. an apparatus for sifting or blowing dry poisons on plants to kill insects. 4. a contrivance for removing dust by sifting; sieve. 5 …   Useful english dictionary

  • dust-up — dust ups N COUNT A dust up is a quarrel that often involves some fighting. [INFORMAL] He s now facing suspension after a dust up with the referee. Syn: scrap …   English dictionary

  • dust — [n] tiny particles in the air ashes, cinders, dirt, dust bunnies*, earth, filth, flakes, fragments, gilings, granules, grime, grit, ground, lint, loess, powder, refuse, sand, smut, soil, soot; concept 437 dust [v] sprinkle tiny particles… …   New thesaurus

  • dust-up — [dust′up΄] n. Slang a commotion, quarrel, or fight * * * …   Universalium

  • dust — is used as a simile for annihilation (2 Kgs. 13:7). In the NT dust on the head was a sign of repentance (Rev. 18:19) but when shaken off the feet it was either a warning of judgement [[➝ Judgement]] to come (perhaps Matt. 10:14) or a gesture of… …   Dictionary of the Bible


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