Dickens


Dickens
Recorded in the spellings of Dick, and then the patronymic Dickin, Dickon, Dicken, (Dick + kin) Dickson and Dixon (Dick + son), and then the double patronymic Dickins, Dickens, and Dickons (Dick + kin + s(on)), and finally the triple patronymic Dickenson, Dickinson, and Dickinson, (Dick + kin + son + son!) these are all endearment forms of the famous 'Richard', a name introduced by the Normans after the 1066 Invasion of England. 'Richard' is not a Norman name but German, and as such was 'borrowed' by the Norse (Viking) invaders as they swept south both on land through Northern Europe and by sea to Britain and Ireland, in the 7th century a.d. The name translates as 'brave-powerful', a meaning which no doubt contributed to its early popularity, but it was from the time of the famous King Richard 1st of England, known as 'The Lionheart', (1160 - 1199), who was associated with the development of English nationalism, that the surname development took place, ultimately unsurpassed by any other British surname. Early recordings include Ricard Dicun of Bedfordshire in the charter rolls of the year 1230 a.d., and John Dycon in the 1327 Subsidy Rolls of Staffordshire year. Later examples of church recordings include Aaron Dykyns who was christened on August 16th 1555, at St. Michael's, Cornhill, London, Anne Dikins, who was christened on July 1st 1666, at St. Mary Somerset, London, and Thomas Dickin was High Sheriff of Shropshire in 1799. Charles Dickens (1812 - 1870), the famous Victorian novelist, made his fortune in America in 1868-70, but died in London shortly after his return. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Richard Dicun, which was dated 1203, a witness at the Assize Court of Staffordshire, during the reign of King John, known as "Lackland", 1199 - 1216. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • DICKENS (C.) — Charles Dickens est, avec Shakespeare et Emily Brontë, l’un des très rares écrivains anglais qui jouissent d’une véritable popularité en France. Dans son pays natal, après avoit été adulé de son vivant, il connut l’inévitable éclipse qui suit… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Dickens — ist der Name folgender Personen: Arthur Geoffrey Dickens (1910–2001), englischer Historiker Bill Dickens (* 1958), US amerikanischer Bassist, Songwriter und Musikproduzent Charles Dickens (1812–1870), englischer Schriftsteller Christopher Dickens …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Dickens —   [ dɪkɪnz],    1) Charles, englischer Schriftsteller, * Portsmouth 7. 2. 1812, ✝ Gadshill Place (bei Rochester) 9. 6. 1870. Dickens stammte aus ärmlichen, aber bürgerlichen Verhältnissen. Er wurde 1827 Schreiber bei einem Rechtsanwalt, 1829… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • Dickens — Dickens, IA U.S. city in Iowa Population (2000): 202 Housing Units (2000): 83 Land area (2000): 0.838376 sq. miles (2.171383 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.838376 sq. miles (2.171383 sq. km)… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Dickens, IA — U.S. city in Iowa Population (2000): 202 Housing Units (2000): 83 Land area (2000): 0.838376 sq. miles (2.171383 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.838376 sq. miles (2.171383 sq. km) FIPS code:… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Dickens, TX — U.S. city in Texas Population (2000): 332 Housing Units (2000): 163 Land area (2000): 0.976282 sq. miles (2.528558 sq. km) Water area (2000): 0.000000 sq. miles (0.000000 sq. km) Total area (2000): 0.976282 sq. miles (2.528558 sq. km) FIPS code:… …   StarDict's U.S. Gazetteer Places

  • Dickens — Dick ens, n. or interj. [Perh. a contr. of the dim. devilkins.] The devil. [A vulgar euphemism.] [1913 Webster] I can not tell what the dickens his name is. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • dickens — exclamation, 1590s, apparently a substitute for devil; probably altered from Dickon, nickname for RICHARD (Cf. Richard) and source of the surnames Dickens and Dickenson, but exact derivation and meaning are unknown …   Etymology dictionary

  • dickens — ► NOUN informal ▪ used to express annoyance or surprise when asking questions: what the dickens is going on? ORIGIN a euphemism for «devil» …   English terms dictionary

  • dickens — [dik′ənz] n. [prob. < Dickon, nickname for RICHARD1] [Old Brit. Slang] devil; deuce: used, with the, only in interjectional phrases, as a mild oath or exclamation of annoyance, surprise, or frustration [what the dickens is that about?] …   English World dictionary

  • Dickens — Dickens, Charles (pseudonym Boz), geb. 7. Febr. 1812 in Portsmouth, wurde in London u. Chatham erzogen u. trat als Gehülfe bei einem Advocaten in London in Dienste. Durch Selbstudium suchte er seine Kenntnisse zu erweitern u. sich eine tiefere… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.