Crosser


Crosser
This interesting name is of early medieval English and French origin, and is an occupational surname for the bearer of a cross or a bishop's crook in ecclesiastical processions, or of the cross at a monastery. The name might also have been used of someone who made and sold crosses or to someone living by a cross. The surname derives from the Middle English and Old French word "Croisier" or "Crocier", originally an agent derivative of the Old French "Crois", cross, but later associated also with "Croce" meaning "crook". Job descriptive surnames originally denoted the actual occupation of the namebearer, and later became hereditary. The early recordings of the surname are usually found as "Croyser", while the modern forms are "Crozier, Crosier and Crosser". Joseph Crozier was christened on the 30th March 1713 at St. Botolph, Bishopsgate in London. The Coat of Arms most associated with the name has the blazon of a blue shield, on a silver fess between three gold crosses crosslet placed saltireways, as many black martlets. The Crest being an arm vested erect holding a gold crosier. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William le Croyser, which was dated 1264, in the "Eynsham Cartulary", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • crosser — [ krɔse ] v. tr. <conjug. : 1> • XIIIe; de crosse ♦ Rare Pousser avec une crosse. Crosser une balle, un palet. ● crosser verbe transitif Populaire et vieux Battre à coups de …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • crosser — CROSSER. v. n. Pousser une balle, une pierre, etc. avec une crosse. Cet enfant est allé crosser. Les petits garçons aiment fort à crosser.Crosser, se dit aussi figurément et familièrement, pour dire, Traiter avec un grand mépris. C est un homme à …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie Française 1798

  • crosser — Crosser. v. n. Pousser une bale avec une crosse. Cet enfant est allé crosser. les petits garçons aiment fort à crosser …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • CROSSER — v. n. Pousser une balle, une pierre, etc., avec une crosse. Cet enfant est allé crosser. Ce petit garçon aime beaucoup à crosser.   Il est aussi verbe actif. Crosser une balle, une pierre, etc.   Il signifie, figurément et familièrement, Traiter… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • crosser — (kro sé) 1°   V. n. Jouer à la crosse. Cet enfant est allé crosser. 2°   V. a. Crosser une balle, une pierre, la pousser avec la crosse.    Fig. et familièrement, traiter durement, avec mépris. On l a crossé comme il le méritait. •   [Les… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • CROSSER — v. intr. Pousser avec une crosse. Crosser une balle, une pierre etc. Il signifie, figurément et familièrement, Traiter quelqu’un avec le plus grand mépris. C’est un homme à crosser …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 8eme edition (1935)

  • crosser — cross ► NOUN 1) a mark, object, or figure formed by two short intersecting lines or pieces (+ or x). 2) an upright post with a transverse bar, as used in antiquity for crucifixion. 3) a cross shaped decoration awarded for bravery or indicating… …   English terms dictionary

  • crosser — noun see cross II …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • crosser — See cross. * * * …   Universalium

  • crosser — noun Someone who crosses; agent noun of cross …   Wiktionary


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